Maternal breastfeeding attitudes: Association with breastfeeding intent and socio-demographics among urban primiparas

Malini D. Persad, Janell L. Mensinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

Breastfeeding is associated with improved developmental and social outcomes for an infant. Despite these health benefits, only 54% of women breastfeed in the early postpartum period. Although an understanding of socio-demographic characteristics, breastfeeding intent, and breastfeeding attitudes can facilitate breastfeeding initiatives, these factors have not been characterized particularly for urban and immigrant mothers. The objectives of this study are to provide a descriptive analysis of the socio-demographic characteristics, breastfeeding intent, and breastfeeding attitudes of primiparas presenting to an inner city prenatal clinic and determine if breastfeeding attitudes are associated with breastfeeding intent and socio-demographic variables. Of 100 primiparas, 79 reported the intent to breastfeed. Breastfeeding intent was associated with 1) positive breastfeeding attitudes, 2) higher household incomes, 3) being born outside the US, 4) being Afro-Caribbean as opposed to African American, 5) having family, peer, and partner support for breastfeeding, 6) attending breastfeeding classes, and 7) greater years of education. These findings suggest that targeting breastfeeding initiatives towards low-income, less educated, US born mothers who lack breastfeeding support from their loved ones may improve breastfeeding rates among urban primiparas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-60
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Maternal breastfeeding attitudes: Association with breastfeeding intent and socio-demographics among urban primiparas'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this