Maternal race, demography, and health care disparities impact risk for intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm neonates

Seetha Shankaran, Aiping Lin, Jill Maller-Kesselman, Heping Zhang, T. Michael O'Shea, Henrietta S. Bada, Jeffrey Kaiser, Richard P. Lifton, Charles R. Bauer, Laura R. Ment

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To determine whether risk factors associated with grade 2-4 intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) differs between infants of African ancestry and white infants. Study design Inborn, appropriate for gestational age infants with birth weight 500-1250 g and exposure to at least 1 dose of antenatal steroids were enrolled in 24 neonatal intensive care units. Cases had grade 2-4 IVH and controls matched for site, race, and birth weight range had 2 normal ultrasounds read centrally. Multivariate logistic regression modeling identified factors associated with IVH across African ancestry and white race. Results Subjects included 579 African ancestry or white race infants with grade 2-4 IVH and 532 controls. Mothers of African ancestry children were less educated, and white case mothers were more likely to have more than 1 prenatal visit and multiple gestation (P ≤.01 for all). Increasing gestational age (P =.01), preeclampsia (P <.001), complete antenatal steroid exposure (P =.02), cesarean delivery (P <.001), and white race (P =.01) were associated with decreased risk for IVH. Chorioamnionitis (P =.01), 5-minute Apgar score <3 (P <.004), surfactant use (P <.001), and high-frequency ventilation (P <.001) were associated with increased risk for IVH. Among African ancestry infants, having more than 1 prenatal visit was associated with decreased risk (P =.02). Among white infants, multiple gestation was associated with increased risk (P <.001), and higher maternal education was associated with decreased risk (P <.05). Conclusion The risk for IVH differs between infants of African ancestry and white infants, possibly attributable to both race and health care disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume164
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Healthcare Disparities
Mothers
Demography
Newborn Infant
Hemorrhage
Birth Weight
Gestational Age
Steroids
High-Frequency Ventilation
Chorioamnionitis
Pregnancy
Apgar Score
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Pre-Eclampsia
Surface-Active Agents
Logistic Models
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Shankaran, Seetha ; Lin, Aiping ; Maller-Kesselman, Jill ; Zhang, Heping ; O'Shea, T. Michael ; Bada, Henrietta S. ; Kaiser, Jeffrey ; Lifton, Richard P. ; Bauer, Charles R. ; Ment, Laura R. / Maternal race, demography, and health care disparities impact risk for intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm neonates. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2014 ; Vol. 164, No. 5.
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title = "Maternal race, demography, and health care disparities impact risk for intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm neonates",
abstract = "Objective To determine whether risk factors associated with grade 2-4 intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) differs between infants of African ancestry and white infants. Study design Inborn, appropriate for gestational age infants with birth weight 500-1250 g and exposure to at least 1 dose of antenatal steroids were enrolled in 24 neonatal intensive care units. Cases had grade 2-4 IVH and controls matched for site, race, and birth weight range had 2 normal ultrasounds read centrally. Multivariate logistic regression modeling identified factors associated with IVH across African ancestry and white race. Results Subjects included 579 African ancestry or white race infants with grade 2-4 IVH and 532 controls. Mothers of African ancestry children were less educated, and white case mothers were more likely to have more than 1 prenatal visit and multiple gestation (P ≤.01 for all). Increasing gestational age (P =.01), preeclampsia (P <.001), complete antenatal steroid exposure (P =.02), cesarean delivery (P <.001), and white race (P =.01) were associated with decreased risk for IVH. Chorioamnionitis (P =.01), 5-minute Apgar score <3 (P <.004), surfactant use (P <.001), and high-frequency ventilation (P <.001) were associated with increased risk for IVH. Among African ancestry infants, having more than 1 prenatal visit was associated with decreased risk (P =.02). Among white infants, multiple gestation was associated with increased risk (P <.001), and higher maternal education was associated with decreased risk (P <.05). Conclusion The risk for IVH differs between infants of African ancestry and white infants, possibly attributable to both race and health care disparities.",
author = "Seetha Shankaran and Aiping Lin and Jill Maller-Kesselman and Heping Zhang and O'Shea, {T. Michael} and Bada, {Henrietta S.} and Jeffrey Kaiser and Lifton, {Richard P.} and Bauer, {Charles R.} and Ment, {Laura R.}",
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Shankaran, S, Lin, A, Maller-Kesselman, J, Zhang, H, O'Shea, TM, Bada, HS, Kaiser, J, Lifton, RP, Bauer, CR & Ment, LR 2014, 'Maternal race, demography, and health care disparities impact risk for intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm neonates', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 164, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2014.01.036

Maternal race, demography, and health care disparities impact risk for intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm neonates. / Shankaran, Seetha; Lin, Aiping; Maller-Kesselman, Jill; Zhang, Heping; O'Shea, T. Michael; Bada, Henrietta S.; Kaiser, Jeffrey; Lifton, Richard P.; Bauer, Charles R.; Ment, Laura R.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 164, No. 5, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Maternal race, demography, and health care disparities impact risk for intraventricular hemorrhage in preterm neonates

AU - Shankaran, Seetha

AU - Lin, Aiping

AU - Maller-Kesselman, Jill

AU - Zhang, Heping

AU - O'Shea, T. Michael

AU - Bada, Henrietta S.

AU - Kaiser, Jeffrey

AU - Lifton, Richard P.

AU - Bauer, Charles R.

AU - Ment, Laura R.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Objective To determine whether risk factors associated with grade 2-4 intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) differs between infants of African ancestry and white infants. Study design Inborn, appropriate for gestational age infants with birth weight 500-1250 g and exposure to at least 1 dose of antenatal steroids were enrolled in 24 neonatal intensive care units. Cases had grade 2-4 IVH and controls matched for site, race, and birth weight range had 2 normal ultrasounds read centrally. Multivariate logistic regression modeling identified factors associated with IVH across African ancestry and white race. Results Subjects included 579 African ancestry or white race infants with grade 2-4 IVH and 532 controls. Mothers of African ancestry children were less educated, and white case mothers were more likely to have more than 1 prenatal visit and multiple gestation (P ≤.01 for all). Increasing gestational age (P =.01), preeclampsia (P <.001), complete antenatal steroid exposure (P =.02), cesarean delivery (P <.001), and white race (P =.01) were associated with decreased risk for IVH. Chorioamnionitis (P =.01), 5-minute Apgar score <3 (P <.004), surfactant use (P <.001), and high-frequency ventilation (P <.001) were associated with increased risk for IVH. Among African ancestry infants, having more than 1 prenatal visit was associated with decreased risk (P =.02). Among white infants, multiple gestation was associated with increased risk (P <.001), and higher maternal education was associated with decreased risk (P <.05). Conclusion The risk for IVH differs between infants of African ancestry and white infants, possibly attributable to both race and health care disparities.

AB - Objective To determine whether risk factors associated with grade 2-4 intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) differs between infants of African ancestry and white infants. Study design Inborn, appropriate for gestational age infants with birth weight 500-1250 g and exposure to at least 1 dose of antenatal steroids were enrolled in 24 neonatal intensive care units. Cases had grade 2-4 IVH and controls matched for site, race, and birth weight range had 2 normal ultrasounds read centrally. Multivariate logistic regression modeling identified factors associated with IVH across African ancestry and white race. Results Subjects included 579 African ancestry or white race infants with grade 2-4 IVH and 532 controls. Mothers of African ancestry children were less educated, and white case mothers were more likely to have more than 1 prenatal visit and multiple gestation (P ≤.01 for all). Increasing gestational age (P =.01), preeclampsia (P <.001), complete antenatal steroid exposure (P =.02), cesarean delivery (P <.001), and white race (P =.01) were associated with decreased risk for IVH. Chorioamnionitis (P =.01), 5-minute Apgar score <3 (P <.004), surfactant use (P <.001), and high-frequency ventilation (P <.001) were associated with increased risk for IVH. Among African ancestry infants, having more than 1 prenatal visit was associated with decreased risk (P =.02). Among white infants, multiple gestation was associated with increased risk (P <.001), and higher maternal education was associated with decreased risk (P <.05). Conclusion The risk for IVH differs between infants of African ancestry and white infants, possibly attributable to both race and health care disparities.

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