Maternal vitamin D status and small-for-gestational-age offspring in women at high risk for preeclampsia

Alison D. Gernand, Hyagriv N. Simhan, Steve Caritis, Lisa M. Bodnar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine the association between secondtrimester maternal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of small for gestational age (SGA) in singleton live births. Methods: We assayed serum samples at 12-26 weeks of gestation for 25-hydroxyvitamin D in a sample of participants in a multicenter clinical trial of low-dose aspirin for the prevention of preeclampsia in high-risk women (n5792). Multivariable log-binomial regression models were used to assess the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of SGA (birth weight less than the 10th percentile for gestational age) after adjustment for confounders including maternal prepregnancy obesity, race, treatment allocation, and risk group. Results: Thirteen percent of neonates were SGA at birth. Mean (standard deviation) 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were lower in women who delivered SGA (57.9 [29.9] nmol/L) compared with non-SGA neonates (64.8 [29.3] nmol/L, P5.028). In adjusted models, 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of 50-74 nmol/L and 75 nmol/L or greater compared with less than 30 nmol/L were associated with 43% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.33-0.99) and 54% (95% CI 0.24-0.87) reductions in risk of SGA, respectively. Race and maternal obesity each modified this association. White women with 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 nmol/L or greater compared with less than 50 nmol/L had a 68% reduction in SGA risk (adjusted risk ratio 0.32, 95% CI 0.17-0.63) and nonobese women with 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 nmol/L or greater compared with less than 50 nmol/L had a 50% reduction in SGA risk (adjusted risk ratio 0.50, 95% CI 0.31-0.82). There was no association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of SGA in black or obese mothers. Conclusion: Maternal vitamin D status in the second trimester is associated with risk of SGA among all women and in the subgroups of white and nonobese women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)40-48
Number of pages9
JournalObstetrics and gynecology
Volume123
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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