Matrix proteins of Nipah and Hendra viruses interact with beta subunits of AP-3 complexes

Weina Sun, Thomas S. McCrory, Wei Young Khaw, Stephanie Petzing, Terrell Myers, Anthony P. Schmitt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Paramyxoviruses and other negative-strand RNA viruses encode matrix proteins that coordinate the virus assembly process. The matrix proteins link the viral glycoproteins and the viral ribonucleoproteins at virus assembly sites and often recruit host machinery that facilitates the budding process. Using a co-affinity purification strategy, we have identified the beta subunit of the AP-3 adapter protein complex, AP3B1, as a binding partner for theMproteins of the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Binding function was localized to the serine-rich and acidic Hinge domain of AP3B1, and a 29-amino-acid Hingederived polypeptide was sufficient forMprotein binding in coimmunoprecipitation assays. Virus-like particle (VLP) production assays were used to assess the relationship between AP3B1 binding andMprotein function. We found that for both Nipah virus and Hendra virus,Mprotein expression in the absence of any other viral proteins led to the efficient production of VLPs in transfected cells, and this VLP production was potently inhibited upon overexpression of short M-binding polypeptides derived from the Hinge region of AP3B1. Both human and bat (Pteropus alecto) AP3B1-derived polypeptides were highly effective at inhibiting the production of VLPs. VLP production was also impaired through small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of AP3B1 from cells. These findings suggest that AP-3-directed trafficking processes are important for henipavirus particle production and identify a new host protein-virus protein binding interface that could become a useful target in future efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors to combat paramyxoviral infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13099-13110
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of virology
Volume88
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Hendra Virus
Nipah Virus
Nipah virus
Hendra virus
virus-like particles
Virion
Respirovirus
Virus Assembly
polypeptides
viral proteins
Peptides
Henipavirus
Viral Matrix Proteins
Virus Attachment
ribonucleoproteins
Proteins
Ribonucleoproteins
proteins
RNA Viruses
protein binding

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Cite this

Sun, Weina ; McCrory, Thomas S. ; Khaw, Wei Young ; Petzing, Stephanie ; Myers, Terrell ; Schmitt, Anthony P. / Matrix proteins of Nipah and Hendra viruses interact with beta subunits of AP-3 complexes. In: Journal of virology. 2014 ; Vol. 88, No. 22. pp. 13099-13110.
@article{7ea8315f81b6422a883818e375cd5889,
title = "Matrix proteins of Nipah and Hendra viruses interact with beta subunits of AP-3 complexes",
abstract = "Paramyxoviruses and other negative-strand RNA viruses encode matrix proteins that coordinate the virus assembly process. The matrix proteins link the viral glycoproteins and the viral ribonucleoproteins at virus assembly sites and often recruit host machinery that facilitates the budding process. Using a co-affinity purification strategy, we have identified the beta subunit of the AP-3 adapter protein complex, AP3B1, as a binding partner for theMproteins of the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Binding function was localized to the serine-rich and acidic Hinge domain of AP3B1, and a 29-amino-acid Hingederived polypeptide was sufficient forMprotein binding in coimmunoprecipitation assays. Virus-like particle (VLP) production assays were used to assess the relationship between AP3B1 binding andMprotein function. We found that for both Nipah virus and Hendra virus,Mprotein expression in the absence of any other viral proteins led to the efficient production of VLPs in transfected cells, and this VLP production was potently inhibited upon overexpression of short M-binding polypeptides derived from the Hinge region of AP3B1. Both human and bat (Pteropus alecto) AP3B1-derived polypeptides were highly effective at inhibiting the production of VLPs. VLP production was also impaired through small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of AP3B1 from cells. These findings suggest that AP-3-directed trafficking processes are important for henipavirus particle production and identify a new host protein-virus protein binding interface that could become a useful target in future efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors to combat paramyxoviral infections.",
author = "Weina Sun and McCrory, {Thomas S.} and Khaw, {Wei Young} and Stephanie Petzing and Terrell Myers and Schmitt, {Anthony P.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1128/JVI.02103-14",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "88",
pages = "13099--13110",
journal = "Journal of Virology",
issn = "0022-538X",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "22",

}

Matrix proteins of Nipah and Hendra viruses interact with beta subunits of AP-3 complexes. / Sun, Weina; McCrory, Thomas S.; Khaw, Wei Young; Petzing, Stephanie; Myers, Terrell; Schmitt, Anthony P.

In: Journal of virology, Vol. 88, No. 22, 01.01.2014, p. 13099-13110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Matrix proteins of Nipah and Hendra viruses interact with beta subunits of AP-3 complexes

AU - Sun, Weina

AU - McCrory, Thomas S.

AU - Khaw, Wei Young

AU - Petzing, Stephanie

AU - Myers, Terrell

AU - Schmitt, Anthony P.

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - Paramyxoviruses and other negative-strand RNA viruses encode matrix proteins that coordinate the virus assembly process. The matrix proteins link the viral glycoproteins and the viral ribonucleoproteins at virus assembly sites and often recruit host machinery that facilitates the budding process. Using a co-affinity purification strategy, we have identified the beta subunit of the AP-3 adapter protein complex, AP3B1, as a binding partner for theMproteins of the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Binding function was localized to the serine-rich and acidic Hinge domain of AP3B1, and a 29-amino-acid Hingederived polypeptide was sufficient forMprotein binding in coimmunoprecipitation assays. Virus-like particle (VLP) production assays were used to assess the relationship between AP3B1 binding andMprotein function. We found that for both Nipah virus and Hendra virus,Mprotein expression in the absence of any other viral proteins led to the efficient production of VLPs in transfected cells, and this VLP production was potently inhibited upon overexpression of short M-binding polypeptides derived from the Hinge region of AP3B1. Both human and bat (Pteropus alecto) AP3B1-derived polypeptides were highly effective at inhibiting the production of VLPs. VLP production was also impaired through small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of AP3B1 from cells. These findings suggest that AP-3-directed trafficking processes are important for henipavirus particle production and identify a new host protein-virus protein binding interface that could become a useful target in future efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors to combat paramyxoviral infections.

AB - Paramyxoviruses and other negative-strand RNA viruses encode matrix proteins that coordinate the virus assembly process. The matrix proteins link the viral glycoproteins and the viral ribonucleoproteins at virus assembly sites and often recruit host machinery that facilitates the budding process. Using a co-affinity purification strategy, we have identified the beta subunit of the AP-3 adapter protein complex, AP3B1, as a binding partner for theMproteins of the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Binding function was localized to the serine-rich and acidic Hinge domain of AP3B1, and a 29-amino-acid Hingederived polypeptide was sufficient forMprotein binding in coimmunoprecipitation assays. Virus-like particle (VLP) production assays were used to assess the relationship between AP3B1 binding andMprotein function. We found that for both Nipah virus and Hendra virus,Mprotein expression in the absence of any other viral proteins led to the efficient production of VLPs in transfected cells, and this VLP production was potently inhibited upon overexpression of short M-binding polypeptides derived from the Hinge region of AP3B1. Both human and bat (Pteropus alecto) AP3B1-derived polypeptides were highly effective at inhibiting the production of VLPs. VLP production was also impaired through small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of AP3B1 from cells. These findings suggest that AP-3-directed trafficking processes are important for henipavirus particle production and identify a new host protein-virus protein binding interface that could become a useful target in future efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors to combat paramyxoviral infections.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84908377016&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84908377016&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/JVI.02103-14

DO - 10.1128/JVI.02103-14

M3 - Article

C2 - 25210190

AN - SCOPUS:84908377016

VL - 88

SP - 13099

EP - 13110

JO - Journal of Virology

JF - Journal of Virology

SN - 0022-538X

IS - 22

ER -