Maximal power at different percentages of one repetition maximum: Influence of resistance and gender

Gwendolyn Thomas, William J. Kraemer, Barry A. Spiering, Jeff S. Volek, Jeffrey M. Anderson, Carl M. Maresh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thomas, G.A., W.J. Kraemer, B.A. Spiering, J.S. Volek, J.M. Anderson, and C.M. Maresh. Maximal power at difference percentages of one repetition maximum: Influence of resistance and gender. J. Strength Cond. Res. 21(2):336-342. 2007. - National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletes were tested to determine the load at which maximal mechanical output is achieved. Athletes performed power testing at 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70% of individual 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in the squat jump, bench press, and hang pull exercises. Additionally, hang pull power testing was performed using free-form (i.e., barbell) and fixed-form (i.e., Smith machine) techniques. There were differences between genders in optimal power output during the squat jump (30-40% of 1RM for men; 30-50% of 1RM for women) and bench throw (30% of 1RM for men; 30-50% of 1RM for women) exercises. There were no gender or form interactions during the hang pull exercise; maximal power output during the hang pull occurred at 30-60% of 1RM. In conclusion, these results indicate that (a) gender differences exist in the load at which maximal power output occurs during the squat jump and bench throw; and (b) although no gender or form interactions occurred during the hang pull exercise, greater power could be generated during fixed-form exercise. In general, 30% of 1RM will elicit peak power outputs for both genders and all exercises used in this study, allowing this standard percentage to be used as a starting point in order to train maximal mechanical power output capabilities in these lifts in strength trained athletes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)336-342
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of strength and conditioning research
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Thomas, Gwendolyn ; Kraemer, William J. ; Spiering, Barry A. ; Volek, Jeff S. ; Anderson, Jeffrey M. ; Maresh, Carl M. / Maximal power at different percentages of one repetition maximum : Influence of resistance and gender. In: Journal of strength and conditioning research. 2007 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 336-342.
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abstract = "Thomas, G.A., W.J. Kraemer, B.A. Spiering, J.S. Volek, J.M. Anderson, and C.M. Maresh. Maximal power at difference percentages of one repetition maximum: Influence of resistance and gender. J. Strength Cond. Res. 21(2):336-342. 2007. - National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I athletes were tested to determine the load at which maximal mechanical output is achieved. Athletes performed power testing at 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70{\%} of individual 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in the squat jump, bench press, and hang pull exercises. Additionally, hang pull power testing was performed using free-form (i.e., barbell) and fixed-form (i.e., Smith machine) techniques. There were differences between genders in optimal power output during the squat jump (30-40{\%} of 1RM for men; 30-50{\%} of 1RM for women) and bench throw (30{\%} of 1RM for men; 30-50{\%} of 1RM for women) exercises. There were no gender or form interactions during the hang pull exercise; maximal power output during the hang pull occurred at 30-60{\%} of 1RM. In conclusion, these results indicate that (a) gender differences exist in the load at which maximal power output occurs during the squat jump and bench throw; and (b) although no gender or form interactions occurred during the hang pull exercise, greater power could be generated during fixed-form exercise. In general, 30{\%} of 1RM will elicit peak power outputs for both genders and all exercises used in this study, allowing this standard percentage to be used as a starting point in order to train maximal mechanical power output capabilities in these lifts in strength trained athletes.",
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Maximal power at different percentages of one repetition maximum : Influence of resistance and gender. / Thomas, Gwendolyn; Kraemer, William J.; Spiering, Barry A.; Volek, Jeff S.; Anderson, Jeffrey M.; Maresh, Carl M.

In: Journal of strength and conditioning research, Vol. 21, No. 2, 01.05.2007, p. 336-342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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