Measured performance of a direct-contact heat recovery system installed at a commercial bakery

Hugh I. Henderson, Daniel Edward Ciolkosz, Pablo S. Guerrero, Dana L. Levy

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Many industrial processes can benefit from heat recovery. This paper presents measured results from a direct-contact heat recovery system installed at a large commercial bakery in Brooklyn, NY. The wet-spray, direct-contact system recovers heat from the exhaust stack of a gas-fired commercial baking oven. Heat is transferred to the water via mass and heat exchange in a packed tower (or percotherm). The hot water from the percotherm is used to preheat makeup air supplied to the facility as well as to preheat makeup water for a boiler feedwater system. Detailed energy use and performance data were collected at 15-minute intervals for nearly one year to quantify system performance. The unit's programmable controller was used to collect the monitored data. Sufficient data were collected to predict annual operating trends and extend the analysis to other locations around New York State. Utility rates were also used to extend the economic analysis from this site to other cities around the state. The results showed that the annual value of the recovered heat ranged from $4,500 to $8,000, which was much less than the expected savings. The modest savings occurred because of the unexpectedly light loads on the steam boiler. Parasitic electric use by pumps and fans, which increased costs by $1,800 annually, also diminished the net savings. This result illustrates the uncertainty with projecting production-driven loads on equipment in industrial settings. The cost effectiveness of these systems often depends strongly on future projections of energy use and production capacity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages339-350
Number of pages12
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Event5th Biennial ACEEE Conference on Energy Efficiency in Industry - Tarrytown, NY, United States
Duration: Jul 24 2001Jul 27 2001

Other

Other5th Biennial ACEEE Conference on Energy Efficiency in Industry
CountryUnited States
CityTarrytown, NY
Period7/24/017/27/01

Fingerprint

Bakeries
Waste heat utilization
Boilers
Water
Economic analysis
Ovens
Programmable logic controllers
Cost effectiveness
Towers
Fans
Steam
Pumps
Hot Temperature
Air
Gases
Costs

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Energy(all)

Cite this

Henderson, H. I., Ciolkosz, D. E., Guerrero, P. S., & Levy, D. L. (2001). Measured performance of a direct-contact heat recovery system installed at a commercial bakery. 339-350. Paper presented at 5th Biennial ACEEE Conference on Energy Efficiency in Industry, Tarrytown, NY, United States.
Henderson, Hugh I. ; Ciolkosz, Daniel Edward ; Guerrero, Pablo S. ; Levy, Dana L. / Measured performance of a direct-contact heat recovery system installed at a commercial bakery. Paper presented at 5th Biennial ACEEE Conference on Energy Efficiency in Industry, Tarrytown, NY, United States.12 p.
@conference{ea97ef5385054887b2526732dbfefd96,
title = "Measured performance of a direct-contact heat recovery system installed at a commercial bakery",
abstract = "Many industrial processes can benefit from heat recovery. This paper presents measured results from a direct-contact heat recovery system installed at a large commercial bakery in Brooklyn, NY. The wet-spray, direct-contact system recovers heat from the exhaust stack of a gas-fired commercial baking oven. Heat is transferred to the water via mass and heat exchange in a packed tower (or percotherm). The hot water from the percotherm is used to preheat makeup air supplied to the facility as well as to preheat makeup water for a boiler feedwater system. Detailed energy use and performance data were collected at 15-minute intervals for nearly one year to quantify system performance. The unit's programmable controller was used to collect the monitored data. Sufficient data were collected to predict annual operating trends and extend the analysis to other locations around New York State. Utility rates were also used to extend the economic analysis from this site to other cities around the state. The results showed that the annual value of the recovered heat ranged from $4,500 to $8,000, which was much less than the expected savings. The modest savings occurred because of the unexpectedly light loads on the steam boiler. Parasitic electric use by pumps and fans, which increased costs by $1,800 annually, also diminished the net savings. This result illustrates the uncertainty with projecting production-driven loads on equipment in industrial settings. The cost effectiveness of these systems often depends strongly on future projections of energy use and production capacity.",
author = "Henderson, {Hugh I.} and Ciolkosz, {Daniel Edward} and Guerrero, {Pablo S.} and Levy, {Dana L.}",
year = "2001",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
pages = "339--350",
note = "5th Biennial ACEEE Conference on Energy Efficiency in Industry ; Conference date: 24-07-2001 Through 27-07-2001",

}

Henderson, HI, Ciolkosz, DE, Guerrero, PS & Levy, DL 2001, 'Measured performance of a direct-contact heat recovery system installed at a commercial bakery', Paper presented at 5th Biennial ACEEE Conference on Energy Efficiency in Industry, Tarrytown, NY, United States, 7/24/01 - 7/27/01 pp. 339-350.

Measured performance of a direct-contact heat recovery system installed at a commercial bakery. / Henderson, Hugh I.; Ciolkosz, Daniel Edward; Guerrero, Pablo S.; Levy, Dana L.

2001. 339-350 Paper presented at 5th Biennial ACEEE Conference on Energy Efficiency in Industry, Tarrytown, NY, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - Measured performance of a direct-contact heat recovery system installed at a commercial bakery

AU - Henderson, Hugh I.

AU - Ciolkosz, Daniel Edward

AU - Guerrero, Pablo S.

AU - Levy, Dana L.

PY - 2001/1/1

Y1 - 2001/1/1

N2 - Many industrial processes can benefit from heat recovery. This paper presents measured results from a direct-contact heat recovery system installed at a large commercial bakery in Brooklyn, NY. The wet-spray, direct-contact system recovers heat from the exhaust stack of a gas-fired commercial baking oven. Heat is transferred to the water via mass and heat exchange in a packed tower (or percotherm). The hot water from the percotherm is used to preheat makeup air supplied to the facility as well as to preheat makeup water for a boiler feedwater system. Detailed energy use and performance data were collected at 15-minute intervals for nearly one year to quantify system performance. The unit's programmable controller was used to collect the monitored data. Sufficient data were collected to predict annual operating trends and extend the analysis to other locations around New York State. Utility rates were also used to extend the economic analysis from this site to other cities around the state. The results showed that the annual value of the recovered heat ranged from $4,500 to $8,000, which was much less than the expected savings. The modest savings occurred because of the unexpectedly light loads on the steam boiler. Parasitic electric use by pumps and fans, which increased costs by $1,800 annually, also diminished the net savings. This result illustrates the uncertainty with projecting production-driven loads on equipment in industrial settings. The cost effectiveness of these systems often depends strongly on future projections of energy use and production capacity.

AB - Many industrial processes can benefit from heat recovery. This paper presents measured results from a direct-contact heat recovery system installed at a large commercial bakery in Brooklyn, NY. The wet-spray, direct-contact system recovers heat from the exhaust stack of a gas-fired commercial baking oven. Heat is transferred to the water via mass and heat exchange in a packed tower (or percotherm). The hot water from the percotherm is used to preheat makeup air supplied to the facility as well as to preheat makeup water for a boiler feedwater system. Detailed energy use and performance data were collected at 15-minute intervals for nearly one year to quantify system performance. The unit's programmable controller was used to collect the monitored data. Sufficient data were collected to predict annual operating trends and extend the analysis to other locations around New York State. Utility rates were also used to extend the economic analysis from this site to other cities around the state. The results showed that the annual value of the recovered heat ranged from $4,500 to $8,000, which was much less than the expected savings. The modest savings occurred because of the unexpectedly light loads on the steam boiler. Parasitic electric use by pumps and fans, which increased costs by $1,800 annually, also diminished the net savings. This result illustrates the uncertainty with projecting production-driven loads on equipment in industrial settings. The cost effectiveness of these systems often depends strongly on future projections of energy use and production capacity.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035710740&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035710740&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Paper

AN - SCOPUS:0035710740

SP - 339

EP - 350

ER -

Henderson HI, Ciolkosz DE, Guerrero PS, Levy DL. Measured performance of a direct-contact heat recovery system installed at a commercial bakery. 2001. Paper presented at 5th Biennial ACEEE Conference on Energy Efficiency in Industry, Tarrytown, NY, United States.