Measurement issues associated with conditional reasoning tests: Indirect measurement and test faking

James M. Lebreton, Jennifer Robin, Cheryl D. Barksciale, Lawrence R. James

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conditional reasoning is a new measurement technique used to measure cognitive biases associated with latent personality motives. The current article describes 3 studies examining 2 related measurement issues associated with conditional reasoning tests (CRTs). Study 1 examined the necessity of maintaining indirect assessment when administering CRTs. Results indicated that, compared with a control condition, 2 experimental conditions that disclosed the purpose of assessment yielded significant mean shifts on a CRT. Study 2 explored whether CRTs could be faked when the purpose of assessment was not disclosed. Results indicated that when indirect measurement was maintained, CRTs appeared to be resistant to faking. Study 3 compared scores on the Conditional Reasoning Test for Aggression across student, applicant, and incumbent samples. Results indicated no significant mean differences among these samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume92
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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Aggression
Personality
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Lebreton, James M. ; Robin, Jennifer ; Barksciale, Cheryl D. ; James, Lawrence R. / Measurement issues associated with conditional reasoning tests : Indirect measurement and test faking. In: Journal of Applied Psychology. 2007 ; Vol. 92, No. 1. pp. 1-16.
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Measurement issues associated with conditional reasoning tests : Indirect measurement and test faking. / Lebreton, James M.; Robin, Jennifer; Barksciale, Cheryl D.; James, Lawrence R.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 92, No. 1, 01.01.2007, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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