Measurement of Viscosity of Densifying Glass-Based Systems by Isothermal Cyclic Loading Dilatometry

Aravind Mohanram, Gary Lynn Messing, David J. Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study describes the isothermal cyclic loading dilatometry (ICLD) technique to measure the viscosity of glass-based materials. We demonstrate its merit relative to constant-load techniques in minimizing the stress history effects (changes in shrinkage anisotropy and sample microstructure) that arise due to the application of an external load. A constant-load test overestimates the viscosity by an order of magnitude compared with a cyclic load test. To obtain accurate viscosity data, maximum loading rates and longer unloading periods are desirable as they reduce effects of shrinkage anisotropy on viscosity values. Representative data for a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) material are reported. Nonparametric statistical tests revealed insignificant differences between the viscosity data sets at 5% significance level and thus indicate good reproducibility of the testing methodology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-196
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Ceramic Society
Volume87
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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cyclic loading
viscosity
glass
Viscosity
Glass
Anisotropy
anisotropy
Cyclic loads
Statistical tests
unloading
Ceramic materials
Unloading
ceramics
Loads (forces)
microstructure
Microstructure
methodology
Testing
history
test

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Geology
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

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Measurement of Viscosity of Densifying Glass-Based Systems by Isothermal Cyclic Loading Dilatometry. / Mohanram, Aravind; Messing, Gary Lynn; Green, David J.

In: Journal of the American Ceramic Society, Vol. 87, No. 2, 01.01.2004, p. 192-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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