Measurements of Si hybrid CMOS x-ray detector characteristics

Stephen D. Bongiorno, Abraham D. Falcone, David N. Burrows, Robert Cook

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recent development of active pixel sensors as X-Ray focal plane arrays will place them in contention with CCDs on future satellite missions. Penn State University (PSU) is working with Teledyne Imaging Sensors (TIS) to develop X-Ray Hybrid CMOS devices (HCDs), a type of active pixel sensor with fast frame rates, adaptable readout timing and geometry, low power consumption, and inherent radiation hardness. CCDs have been used with great success on the current generation of X-Ray telescopes (e.g. Chandra, XMM, Suzaku, and Swift). However, their bucket-brigade readout architecture, which transfers charge across the chip with discrete component readout electronics, results in clockrate limited readout speeds that cause pileup (saturation) of bright sources and an inherent susceptibility to radiation induced displacement damage that limits mission lifetime. In contrast, HCDs read pixels through the detector substrate with low power, on-chip readout integrated circuits. Faster frame rates, achieved with adaptable readout timing and geometry, will allow the next generation's larger effective area telescopes to observe brighter sources free of pileup. In HCDs, radiation damaged lattice sites affect a single pixel instead of an entire row. The PSU X-ray group is currently testing 4 Teledyne HCDs, with low cross-talk CTIA devices in development. We will report laboratory measurements of HCD readnoise, interpixel-capacitance and its impact on event selection, linearity, and energy resolution as a function of energy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHigh Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for Astronomy IV
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 7 2010
EventHigh Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for Astronomy IV - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Jun 27 2010Jun 30 2010

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume7742
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherHigh Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for Astronomy IV
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period6/27/106/30/10

Fingerprint

X-ray Detectors
x ray detectors
readout
CMOS
Pixels
Detectors
X rays
pixels
Charge coupled devices
Radiation
Telescopes
Active pixel Sensor
Sensors
Focal plane arrays
Geometry
Timing
charge coupled devices
sensors
Chip
x rays

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Bongiorno, S. D., Falcone, A. D., Burrows, D. N., & Cook, R. (2010). Measurements of Si hybrid CMOS x-ray detector characteristics. In High Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for Astronomy IV [77420R] (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 7742). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.856718
Bongiorno, Stephen D. ; Falcone, Abraham D. ; Burrows, David N. ; Cook, Robert. / Measurements of Si hybrid CMOS x-ray detector characteristics. High Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for Astronomy IV. 2010. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering).
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Bongiorno, SD, Falcone, AD, Burrows, DN & Cook, R 2010, Measurements of Si hybrid CMOS x-ray detector characteristics. in High Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for Astronomy IV., 77420R, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, vol. 7742, High Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for Astronomy IV, San Diego, CA, United States, 6/27/10. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.856718

Measurements of Si hybrid CMOS x-ray detector characteristics. / Bongiorno, Stephen D.; Falcone, Abraham D.; Burrows, David N.; Cook, Robert.

High Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for Astronomy IV. 2010. 77420R (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 7742).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Bongiorno SD, Falcone AD, Burrows DN, Cook R. Measurements of Si hybrid CMOS x-ray detector characteristics. In High Energy, Optical, and Infrared Detectors for Astronomy IV. 2010. 77420R. (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.856718