Measuring and reducing college students' procrastination

Christopher J. Perrin, Neal Miller, Alayna T. Haberlin, Jonathan William Ivy, James N. Meindl, Nancy A. Neef

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined college students' procrastination when studying for weekly in-class quizzes. Two schedules of online practice quiz delivery were compared using a multiple baseline design. When online study material was made available noncontingently, students usually procrastinated. When access to additional study material was contingent on completing previous study material, studying was more evenly distributed. Overall, the mean gain in percentage correct scores on weekly in-class quizzes relative to pretests was greater during contingent access than during noncontingent access conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-474
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of applied behavior analysis
Volume44
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

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study materials
quiz
Students
Appointments and Schedules
student
College Students
Contingent

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Philosophy

Cite this

Perrin, C. J., Miller, N., Haberlin, A. T., Ivy, J. W., Meindl, J. N., & Neef, N. A. (2011). Measuring and reducing college students' procrastination. Journal of applied behavior analysis, 44(3), 463-474. https://doi.org/10.1901/jaba.2011.44-463
Perrin, Christopher J. ; Miller, Neal ; Haberlin, Alayna T. ; Ivy, Jonathan William ; Meindl, James N. ; Neef, Nancy A. / Measuring and reducing college students' procrastination. In: Journal of applied behavior analysis. 2011 ; Vol. 44, No. 3. pp. 463-474.
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Perrin, CJ, Miller, N, Haberlin, AT, Ivy, JW, Meindl, JN & Neef, NA 2011, 'Measuring and reducing college students' procrastination', Journal of applied behavior analysis, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 463-474. https://doi.org/10.1901/jaba.2011.44-463

Measuring and reducing college students' procrastination. / Perrin, Christopher J.; Miller, Neal; Haberlin, Alayna T.; Ivy, Jonathan William; Meindl, James N.; Neef, Nancy A.

In: Journal of applied behavior analysis, Vol. 44, No. 3, 01.09.2011, p. 463-474.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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