Measuring individuals' concerns over collective privacy on social networking sites

Haiyan Jia, Heng Xu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

With the rise of social networking sites (SNSs), individuals not only disclose personal information but also share private information concerning others online. While shared information is co-constructed by self and others, personal and collective privacy boundaries become blurred. Thus there is an increasing concern over information privacy beyond the individual level. Drawing on the Communication Privacy Management theory, we conceptualize individuals' concerns over collective privacy on SNSs, with three distinctive dimensions-collective information access, control and diffusion, and develop a scale of collective SNS privacy concern (SNSPC) through empirical validation. Structural model analyses confirm the three-dimension structure of collective SNSPC and indicate perceived risk and propensity to value privacy as two antecedents. We discuss key findings, implications and future research directions for theorizing and examining privacy as a collective issue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 International Conference on Information Systems: Exploring the Information Frontier, ICIS 2015
PublisherAssociation for Information Systems
StatePublished - 2015
Event2015 International Conference on Information Systems: Exploring the Information Frontier, ICIS 2015 - Fort Worth, United States
Duration: Dec 13 2015Dec 16 2015

Other

Other2015 International Conference on Information Systems: Exploring the Information Frontier, ICIS 2015
CountryUnited States
CityFort Worth
Period12/13/1512/16/15

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Applied Mathematics

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