Measuring legislative collaboration: The Senate press events network

Bruce A. Desmarais, Jr., Vincent G. Moscardelli, Brian F. Schaffner, Michael S. Kowal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scholarship regarding the causes and consequences of legislative collaboration has drawn several insights through the application of network analysis. Previously used measures of legislative relationships may be heavily driven by non-relational factors such as ideological or policy-area preferences. We introduce participation in joint press events held by U.S. Senators as records of collaboration and the networks they comprise. This measure captures intentional relationships between legislators along the full timeline of collaboration. We show that there is substantial community structure underlying press event networks that goes beyond political party affiliation, and that press event collaboration predicts overlap in roll call voting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-54
Number of pages12
JournalSocial Networks
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Politics
senate
Joints
event
policy area
network analysis
voting
participation
cause
TimeLine
community

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Desmarais, Jr., Bruce A. ; Moscardelli, Vincent G. ; Schaffner, Brian F. ; Kowal, Michael S. / Measuring legislative collaboration : The Senate press events network. In: Social Networks. 2015 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 43-54.
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Measuring legislative collaboration : The Senate press events network. / Desmarais, Jr., Bruce A.; Moscardelli, Vincent G.; Schaffner, Brian F.; Kowal, Michael S.

In: Social Networks, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 43-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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