Measuring OH and HO2 in the troposphere by laser-induced fluorescence at low pressure

William Henry Brune, P. S. Stevens, J. H. Mather

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hydroxyl radical OH oxidizes many trace gases in the atmosphere. It initiates and then participates in chemical reactions that lead to such phenomena as photochemical smog, acid rain, and stratospheric ozone depletion. Because OH is so reactive, its volume mixing ratio is less than one part per trillion volume (pptv) throughout the troposphere. Its close chemical cousin, the hydroperoxyl radical HO2, participates in many reactions as well. The authors have developed an instrument capable of measuring OH and HO2 by laser- induced fluorescence in a detection chamber at lower pressure. This instrument is now being adapted to aircaraft use for measurements throughout the troposphere. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3328-3336
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the Atmospheric Sciences
Volume52
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

laser induced fluorescence
low pressure
troposphere
acid rain
hydroxyl radical
trace gas
mixing ratio
chemical reaction
atmosphere
measuring
detection
chemical
stratospheric ozone depletion
photochemical smog

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

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abstract = "The hydroxyl radical OH oxidizes many trace gases in the atmosphere. It initiates and then participates in chemical reactions that lead to such phenomena as photochemical smog, acid rain, and stratospheric ozone depletion. Because OH is so reactive, its volume mixing ratio is less than one part per trillion volume (pptv) throughout the troposphere. Its close chemical cousin, the hydroperoxyl radical HO2, participates in many reactions as well. The authors have developed an instrument capable of measuring OH and HO2 by laser- induced fluorescence in a detection chamber at lower pressure. This instrument is now being adapted to aircaraft use for measurements throughout the troposphere. -from Authors",
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Measuring OH and HO2 in the troposphere by laser-induced fluorescence at low pressure. / Brune, William Henry; Stevens, P. S.; Mather, J. H.

In: Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, Vol. 52, No. 19, 01.01.1995, p. 3328-3336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Measuring OH and HO2 in the troposphere by laser-induced fluorescence at low pressure

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AU - Stevens, P. S.

AU - Mather, J. H.

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AB - The hydroxyl radical OH oxidizes many trace gases in the atmosphere. It initiates and then participates in chemical reactions that lead to such phenomena as photochemical smog, acid rain, and stratospheric ozone depletion. Because OH is so reactive, its volume mixing ratio is less than one part per trillion volume (pptv) throughout the troposphere. Its close chemical cousin, the hydroperoxyl radical HO2, participates in many reactions as well. The authors have developed an instrument capable of measuring OH and HO2 by laser- induced fluorescence in a detection chamber at lower pressure. This instrument is now being adapted to aircaraft use for measurements throughout the troposphere. -from Authors

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