Measuring rivalry termination, 1816-1992

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The predominant operationalizations of enduring rivalries use a period of time without a militarized dispute to identify the termination of such rivalries. The author argues that this misses the true termination date of most rivalries because it does not identify when the underlying disputed issues in the rivalry are resolved. The author suggests an operationalization that identifies rivalry termination dates based on a combination of the absence of militarized disputes and the use of public documents and statements that show issue settlement. Such an operationalization can result in significant changes in rivalry termination dates. The 1996 version of the Correlates of War militarized dispute data set is used to apply this new measure to Goertz and Diehl's (1995) set of enduring rivalries to produce new termination dates and show that tests of a model of rivalry termination produce different results when applied to this new data set.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-254
Number of pages28
JournalJournal of Conflict Resolution
Volume41
Issue number2
StatePublished - Apr 1 1997

Fingerprint

operationalization
Rivalry
Termination

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

@article{be2e7e765c024bdcad7eab9570e106c6,
title = "Measuring rivalry termination, 1816-1992",
abstract = "The predominant operationalizations of enduring rivalries use a period of time without a militarized dispute to identify the termination of such rivalries. The author argues that this misses the true termination date of most rivalries because it does not identify when the underlying disputed issues in the rivalry are resolved. The author suggests an operationalization that identifies rivalry termination dates based on a combination of the absence of militarized disputes and the use of public documents and statements that show issue settlement. Such an operationalization can result in significant changes in rivalry termination dates. The 1996 version of the Correlates of War militarized dispute data set is used to apply this new measure to Goertz and Diehl's (1995) set of enduring rivalries to produce new termination dates and show that tests of a model of rivalry termination produce different results when applied to this new data set.",
author = "{Bennett, Jr.}, {David Scott}",
year = "1997",
month = "4",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "227--254",
journal = "Journal of Conflict Resolution",
issn = "0022-0027",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "2",

}

Measuring rivalry termination, 1816-1992. / Bennett, Jr., David Scott.

In: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Vol. 41, No. 2, 01.04.1997, p. 227-254.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Measuring rivalry termination, 1816-1992

AU - Bennett, Jr., David Scott

PY - 1997/4/1

Y1 - 1997/4/1

N2 - The predominant operationalizations of enduring rivalries use a period of time without a militarized dispute to identify the termination of such rivalries. The author argues that this misses the true termination date of most rivalries because it does not identify when the underlying disputed issues in the rivalry are resolved. The author suggests an operationalization that identifies rivalry termination dates based on a combination of the absence of militarized disputes and the use of public documents and statements that show issue settlement. Such an operationalization can result in significant changes in rivalry termination dates. The 1996 version of the Correlates of War militarized dispute data set is used to apply this new measure to Goertz and Diehl's (1995) set of enduring rivalries to produce new termination dates and show that tests of a model of rivalry termination produce different results when applied to this new data set.

AB - The predominant operationalizations of enduring rivalries use a period of time without a militarized dispute to identify the termination of such rivalries. The author argues that this misses the true termination date of most rivalries because it does not identify when the underlying disputed issues in the rivalry are resolved. The author suggests an operationalization that identifies rivalry termination dates based on a combination of the absence of militarized disputes and the use of public documents and statements that show issue settlement. Such an operationalization can result in significant changes in rivalry termination dates. The 1996 version of the Correlates of War militarized dispute data set is used to apply this new measure to Goertz and Diehl's (1995) set of enduring rivalries to produce new termination dates and show that tests of a model of rivalry termination produce different results when applied to this new data set.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=21744459477&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=21744459477&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:21744459477

VL - 41

SP - 227

EP - 254

JO - Journal of Conflict Resolution

JF - Journal of Conflict Resolution

SN - 0022-0027

IS - 2

ER -