Measuring Visual Function in Diabetic Retinopathy: Progress in Basic and Clinical Research

Zeinab Nasralah, William F. Robinson, Gregory R. Jackson, Alistair Barber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Diabetic retinopathy is a common consequence of diabetes mellitus and the leading cause of vision loss in workingage people in the United States. The pathology of this disease is well characterized by microvascular lesions but also
includes deficits in visual function, possibly as a consequence of retinal neurodegeneration. Microvasculature changes are clinically detected by fundus examination and used as the primary method of diagnosis, but functional tests may represent alternative endpoints that may be useful in translational research. Components of visual function can be characterized in a variety of different ways including measures of acuity, contrast sensitivity, dark adaptation and a number of electrophysiological parameters of the retina. This review discusses loss of function as measured both in human and animal models of diabetic retinopathy.
Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology
Volume4
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2013

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