Mechanistic features associated with improvement in mitral regurgitation after cardiac resynchronization therapy and their relation to long-term patient outcome

Tetsuari Onishi, Toshinari Onishi, Josef J. Marek, Mohamed Ahmed, Stephanie C. Haberman, Olusegun Oyenuga, Evan Adelstein, David Schwartzman, Samir Saba, John Gorcsan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background-Mechanisms of mitral regurgitation (MR) reduction with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) are complex, and their association with long-term outcome is unclear. We sought to elucidate mechanistic features of reduction in MR with CRT, which impact long-term patient survival. Methods and Results-A prospective longitudinal study of 277 patients with heart failure with QRS width ≥120 ms and ejection fraction ≤35% for CRT was performed. Quantitative echocardiography, including dyssynchrony analysis, was performed at baseline. MR was quantified by color Doppler before and 6 months after CRT. Predefined end points of death, transplant, or left ventricular assist device were tracked during 4 years. There were 114 (48%) patients with CRT with significant MR (≥moderate) at baseline; of whom 48 (42%) patients had MR improvement, and 24 (19%) patients had MR worsening after CRT. The 66 events (47 deaths, 10 transplantations, and 9 left ventricular assist devices) were strongly associated with significant MR after CRT (hazard ratio, 3.58; 95% confidence interval, 2.18-5.87; P<0.0001). Three echocardiographic features were independently associated with amelioration of significant MR after CRT by multivariable analysis: anteroseptal to posterior wall radial strain dyssynchrony >200 ms, lack of severe left ventricular dilatation (end-systolic dimension index <29 mm/m2), and lack of echocardiographic scar at papillary muscle insertion sites (all P<0.05) and, when combined, were additively associated with long-term survival (P=0.0001). Conclusions-Significant MR after CRT was strongly associated with less favorable long-term survival. Echocardiographic mechanistic features were identified that were associated with improvement in MR after CRT and favorable long-term survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)685-693
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation: Heart Failure
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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