Media multitasking in the classroom: Problematic mobile phone use and impulse control as predictors of texting in the classroom

Yusuke Hayashi, Jeremy N. Nenstiel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study investigated the relation among texting in the classroom, problematic mobile phone use, and executive function. Undergraduate students aged between 18 and 25 years old (68 males and 95 females) completed questionnaires to assess the frequency of texting in the classroom as well as levels of problematic mobile phone use and executive functioning. Hierarchical regressions were performed to evaluate the relative contributions of problematic mobile phone use and executive function in predicting the frequency of texting in class. The results show that problematic mobile phone use was a significant predictor of texting in the classroom after controlling for age, gender, and years of education. The results also show that a subscale of executive function, impulse control, was a significant predictor of texting in the classroom over and above problematic mobile phone use after controlling for the demographic variables. These results support a general conclusion that problematic mobile phone use and impulse control are important factors in one form of media multitasking—texting in the classroom.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4500-4506
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Psychology
Volume40
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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