Medicaid insurance status predicts postoperative mortality after total knee arthroplasty in state inpatient databases

Stephan R. Maman, Michael H. Andreae, Licia K. Gaber-Baylis, Zachary A. Turnbull, Robert S. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim: Medicaid versus private primary insurance status may predict in-hospital mortality and morbidity after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Materials & methods: Regression models were used to test our hypothesis in patients in the State Inpatient Database (SID) from five states who underwent primary TKA from January 2007 to December 2014. Results: Medicaid patients had greater odds of in-hospital mortality (odds ratio [OR]: 1.73; 95% CI: 1.01-2.95), greater odds of any postoperative complications (OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.18-1.33), experience longer lengths of stay (OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.08-1.10) and higher total charges (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.02-1.04). Conclusion: Medicaid insurance status is associated with higher in-hospital mortality and morbidity in patients after TKA compared with private insurance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1213-1228
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Comparative Effectiveness Research
Volume8
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Policy

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