Medical marijuana laws (MMLs) and dispensary provisions not associated with higher odds of adolescent marijuana or heavy marijuana use: A 46 State Analysis, 1991–2015

Julie K. Johnson, Renee M. Johnson, Dominic Hodgkin, Abenaa A. Jones, Alexandra Kritikos, Samantha M. Doonan, Sion K. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: States are rapidly moving to reverse marijuana prohibition, most frequently through legalization of medical marijuana laws (MMLs), and there is concern that marijuana legalization may affect adolescent marijuana use. Methods: This natural-experimental study used state Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) data collected from participants in grades 9–12 from 1991 to 2015 in 46 states (N = 1,091,723). Taking advantage of heterogeneity across states in MML status and MML dispensary design, difference-in-difference estimates compared states with enacted MMLs/dispensaries to non-MML/dispensaries states. Multivariable logistic regression modeling was used to adjust for state and year effects, and student demographics. The main outcome assessed was past 30-day adolescent marijuana use [“any” and “heavy” (≥20)]. Results: In the overall sample, the adjusted odds of adolescents reporting any past 30-day marijuana use was lower in states that enacted MMLs at any time during the study period (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.89 to 0.99; p <.05), and in states with operational dispensaries in 2015 (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.88 to 0.99; p <.05). Among grade cohorts, only 9th graders showed a significant effect, with lower odds of use with MML enactment. We found no effects on heavy marijuana use. Conclusions: This study found no evidence between 1991 and 2015 of increases in adolescents reporting past 30-day marijuana use or heavy marijuana use associated with state MML enactment or operational MML dispensaries. In a constantly evolving marijuana policy landscape, continued monitoring of adolescent marijuana use is important for assessing policy effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSubstance Abuse
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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