Medication-Assisted Treatment and Violent Outcomes in Community-Based Offenders with Alcohol and Drug Use Problems

Sarah L. Desmarais, Julie S. Gray, Candalyn B. Rade, Amy M. Cohn, Stephen Doherty, Kevin Knight

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explored medication-assisted treatment (MAT), the combined use of medication and psychosocial treatment, as a strategy for reducing violent outcomes in community-based offenders. The primary aims were to (a) examine associations between participant characteristics and treatment adherence, (b) examine associations between treatment adherence and substance use, (c) examine associations between treatment adherence and violent outcomes, and (d) determine whether associations between treatment adherence and violent outcomes may be attributable to reductions in substance use. Method: Baseline interviews were completed with 129 male offenders in community-based treatment prior to their 1st MAT appointment. Follow-up interviews (n = 91) were conducted approximately 90 days later. Results: Participant age was associated with medication adherence. Medication nonadherence was associated with at least occasional alcohol use but not drug use. Conversely, missing several counseling sessions was associated with at least occasional drug use but not alcohol use. Results of multivariable analyses suggested MAT may be effective in reducing violent outcomes, and victimization specifically, through reductions in alcohol use. Conclusion: Findings provide evidence supporting MAT as an intervention for victimization. Continued efforts are needed to explore strategies to promote treatment adherence and reduce violent outcomes in community-based offenders with alcohol and drug use problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)378-389
Number of pages12
JournalPsychology of Violence
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

drug use
offender
medication
alcohol
Alcohols
Pharmaceutical Preparations
community
victimization
Therapeutics
Crime Victims
Medication Adherence
counseling session
interview
Interviews
Counseling
Appointments and Schedules
evidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Desmarais, Sarah L. ; Gray, Julie S. ; Rade, Candalyn B. ; Cohn, Amy M. ; Doherty, Stephen ; Knight, Kevin. / Medication-Assisted Treatment and Violent Outcomes in Community-Based Offenders with Alcohol and Drug Use Problems. In: Psychology of Violence. 2016 ; Vol. 6, No. 3. pp. 378-389.
@article{bc21b03d38604f6e9b6d479c1fc26ed8,
title = "Medication-Assisted Treatment and Violent Outcomes in Community-Based Offenders with Alcohol and Drug Use Problems",
abstract = "This study explored medication-assisted treatment (MAT), the combined use of medication and psychosocial treatment, as a strategy for reducing violent outcomes in community-based offenders. The primary aims were to (a) examine associations between participant characteristics and treatment adherence, (b) examine associations between treatment adherence and substance use, (c) examine associations between treatment adherence and violent outcomes, and (d) determine whether associations between treatment adherence and violent outcomes may be attributable to reductions in substance use. Method: Baseline interviews were completed with 129 male offenders in community-based treatment prior to their 1st MAT appointment. Follow-up interviews (n = 91) were conducted approximately 90 days later. Results: Participant age was associated with medication adherence. Medication nonadherence was associated with at least occasional alcohol use but not drug use. Conversely, missing several counseling sessions was associated with at least occasional drug use but not alcohol use. Results of multivariable analyses suggested MAT may be effective in reducing violent outcomes, and victimization specifically, through reductions in alcohol use. Conclusion: Findings provide evidence supporting MAT as an intervention for victimization. Continued efforts are needed to explore strategies to promote treatment adherence and reduce violent outcomes in community-based offenders with alcohol and drug use problems.",
author = "Desmarais, {Sarah L.} and Gray, {Julie S.} and Rade, {Candalyn B.} and Cohn, {Amy M.} and Stephen Doherty and Kevin Knight",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/vio0000047",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "378--389",
journal = "Psychology of Violence",
issn = "2152-0828",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "3",

}

Medication-Assisted Treatment and Violent Outcomes in Community-Based Offenders with Alcohol and Drug Use Problems. / Desmarais, Sarah L.; Gray, Julie S.; Rade, Candalyn B.; Cohn, Amy M.; Doherty, Stephen; Knight, Kevin.

In: Psychology of Violence, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.07.2016, p. 378-389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Medication-Assisted Treatment and Violent Outcomes in Community-Based Offenders with Alcohol and Drug Use Problems

AU - Desmarais, Sarah L.

AU - Gray, Julie S.

AU - Rade, Candalyn B.

AU - Cohn, Amy M.

AU - Doherty, Stephen

AU - Knight, Kevin

PY - 2016/7/1

Y1 - 2016/7/1

N2 - This study explored medication-assisted treatment (MAT), the combined use of medication and psychosocial treatment, as a strategy for reducing violent outcomes in community-based offenders. The primary aims were to (a) examine associations between participant characteristics and treatment adherence, (b) examine associations between treatment adherence and substance use, (c) examine associations between treatment adherence and violent outcomes, and (d) determine whether associations between treatment adherence and violent outcomes may be attributable to reductions in substance use. Method: Baseline interviews were completed with 129 male offenders in community-based treatment prior to their 1st MAT appointment. Follow-up interviews (n = 91) were conducted approximately 90 days later. Results: Participant age was associated with medication adherence. Medication nonadherence was associated with at least occasional alcohol use but not drug use. Conversely, missing several counseling sessions was associated with at least occasional drug use but not alcohol use. Results of multivariable analyses suggested MAT may be effective in reducing violent outcomes, and victimization specifically, through reductions in alcohol use. Conclusion: Findings provide evidence supporting MAT as an intervention for victimization. Continued efforts are needed to explore strategies to promote treatment adherence and reduce violent outcomes in community-based offenders with alcohol and drug use problems.

AB - This study explored medication-assisted treatment (MAT), the combined use of medication and psychosocial treatment, as a strategy for reducing violent outcomes in community-based offenders. The primary aims were to (a) examine associations between participant characteristics and treatment adherence, (b) examine associations between treatment adherence and substance use, (c) examine associations between treatment adherence and violent outcomes, and (d) determine whether associations between treatment adherence and violent outcomes may be attributable to reductions in substance use. Method: Baseline interviews were completed with 129 male offenders in community-based treatment prior to their 1st MAT appointment. Follow-up interviews (n = 91) were conducted approximately 90 days later. Results: Participant age was associated with medication adherence. Medication nonadherence was associated with at least occasional alcohol use but not drug use. Conversely, missing several counseling sessions was associated with at least occasional drug use but not alcohol use. Results of multivariable analyses suggested MAT may be effective in reducing violent outcomes, and victimization specifically, through reductions in alcohol use. Conclusion: Findings provide evidence supporting MAT as an intervention for victimization. Continued efforts are needed to explore strategies to promote treatment adherence and reduce violent outcomes in community-based offenders with alcohol and drug use problems.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84962569971&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84962569971&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/vio0000047

DO - 10.1037/vio0000047

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84962569971

VL - 6

SP - 378

EP - 389

JO - Psychology of Violence

JF - Psychology of Violence

SN - 2152-0828

IS - 3

ER -