Memory for the usual: the influence of schemas on memory for non-schematic information in younger and older adults

Christina E. Webb, Nancy A. Dennis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Schemas are abstract mental representations that influence perceptual and memory processes. Schemas can aide memory for information that is related or congruent with a given schema (i.e., schematic information), yet it is unclear how schemas affect memory for information that does not directly relate to the schema (i.e., non-schematic information). Using a novel scene paradigm, the current series of studies investigated how schemas affect memory for schematic and non-schematic information, as well as how directed encoding influences remembering of both types of information in younger and older adults. Results showed poorer accurate recognition of non-schematic information relative to schematic information, influenced largely by a bias in identifying non-schematic items as “new”. While directed encoding was able to increase remembering of non-schematic information and decrease bias across both age groups, the present set of studies highlights the pervasive influence of a schema on memory for non-schematic information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCognitive Neuropsychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Young Adult
Age Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

@article{e1274c32aeb540e2b71de99c9f9a984a,
title = "Memory for the usual: the influence of schemas on memory for non-schematic information in younger and older adults",
abstract = "Schemas are abstract mental representations that influence perceptual and memory processes. Schemas can aide memory for information that is related or congruent with a given schema (i.e., schematic information), yet it is unclear how schemas affect memory for information that does not directly relate to the schema (i.e., non-schematic information). Using a novel scene paradigm, the current series of studies investigated how schemas affect memory for schematic and non-schematic information, as well as how directed encoding influences remembering of both types of information in younger and older adults. Results showed poorer accurate recognition of non-schematic information relative to schematic information, influenced largely by a bias in identifying non-schematic items as “new”. While directed encoding was able to increase remembering of non-schematic information and decrease bias across both age groups, the present set of studies highlights the pervasive influence of a schema on memory for non-schematic information.",
author = "Webb, {Christina E.} and Dennis, {Nancy A.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/02643294.2019.1674798",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Cognitive Neuropsychology",
issn = "0264-3294",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Memory for the usual

T2 - the influence of schemas on memory for non-schematic information in younger and older adults

AU - Webb, Christina E.

AU - Dennis, Nancy A.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Schemas are abstract mental representations that influence perceptual and memory processes. Schemas can aide memory for information that is related or congruent with a given schema (i.e., schematic information), yet it is unclear how schemas affect memory for information that does not directly relate to the schema (i.e., non-schematic information). Using a novel scene paradigm, the current series of studies investigated how schemas affect memory for schematic and non-schematic information, as well as how directed encoding influences remembering of both types of information in younger and older adults. Results showed poorer accurate recognition of non-schematic information relative to schematic information, influenced largely by a bias in identifying non-schematic items as “new”. While directed encoding was able to increase remembering of non-schematic information and decrease bias across both age groups, the present set of studies highlights the pervasive influence of a schema on memory for non-schematic information.

AB - Schemas are abstract mental representations that influence perceptual and memory processes. Schemas can aide memory for information that is related or congruent with a given schema (i.e., schematic information), yet it is unclear how schemas affect memory for information that does not directly relate to the schema (i.e., non-schematic information). Using a novel scene paradigm, the current series of studies investigated how schemas affect memory for schematic and non-schematic information, as well as how directed encoding influences remembering of both types of information in younger and older adults. Results showed poorer accurate recognition of non-schematic information relative to schematic information, influenced largely by a bias in identifying non-schematic items as “new”. While directed encoding was able to increase remembering of non-schematic information and decrease bias across both age groups, the present set of studies highlights the pervasive influence of a schema on memory for non-schematic information.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074035546&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85074035546&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02643294.2019.1674798

DO - 10.1080/02643294.2019.1674798

M3 - Article

C2 - 31583953

AN - SCOPUS:85074035546

JO - Cognitive Neuropsychology

JF - Cognitive Neuropsychology

SN - 0264-3294

ER -