Mental representations of HPV in Appalachia: Gender, semantic network analysis, and knowledge gaps

Rachel A. Smith, Roxanne L. Parrott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Media coverage has emphasized human papillomavirus (HPV) as a vaccine-preventable, sexually transmitted virus causing cervical cancer. Appalachian undergraduate students (N = 309, 50% female) were surveyed on their knowledge of HPV; analyses of mental representations were similar to content analyses of media coverage of HPV, suggesting media cultivation. Semantic network analysis revealed linkages between vaccine, disease causation and prevention, women's centrality in the representations, and structural differences that varied between vaccinated women, unvaccinated women, and men. The findings provided insights into gaps in the public's understanding of HPV, potential stigmatization of those testing HPV+, and future challenges in vaccinating men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)917-928
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

Fingerprint

Appalachian Region
Semantics
Vaccines
Stereotyping
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Causality
Students
Viruses

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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Mental representations of HPV in Appalachia : Gender, semantic network analysis, and knowledge gaps. / Smith, Rachel A.; Parrott, Roxanne L.

In: Journal of Health Psychology, Vol. 17, No. 6, 01.09.2012, p. 917-928.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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