Mentoring for delinquent children: An outcome study with young adolescent children

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Examined the outcome of a mentoring program aimed at minimizing conduct problems for young adolescent children at risk for delinquent behavior. The program was designed to give an alternative, prosocial role model for children with a history of rule-breaking and acting out behavior in school. Thirteen mentors attended weekly supervision sessions and were responsible for working with 1 at-risk child for 15 h per week. Both parents and teachers assessed behavior change at 4 intervals. Mentors and mentees also completed several evaluations of the program. The parent-report indicated significant decreases in both internalizing and externalizing behavior in the mentees during and at the end of the program. However, no significant changes were found for teacher-reported behavior. The mentors indicated that participating as a mentor enhanced their learning about children and further directed their educational goals. Implications of the effectiveness of mentoring me discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-122
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002

Fingerprint

Mentors
mentoring
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
adolescent
teachers' behavior
parents
Acting Out
Program Evaluation
role model
Risk-Taking
supervision
Parents
Learning
Mentoring
history
evaluation
school
learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Mentoring for delinquent children : An outcome study with young adolescent children. / Jackson, Yolanda.

In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Vol. 31, No. 2, 01.12.2002, p. 115-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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