Metabolic syndrome, its preeminent clusters, incident coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality - Results of prospective analysis for the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study

Y. Hong, X. Jin, J. Mo, H. M. Lin, Y. Duan, M. Pu, Deborah Wolbrette, Duanping Liao

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Abstract

Objective. To investigate the prospective association between Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease (CHD) and all-cause mortality. Subjects and Design. A bi-racial cohort of 14 699 middle-aged Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study were followed for the development of new CHD and death over a period of 9 years. MetS, using the original ATP-III criteria, was defined as having at least three of the following components: elevated blood pressure (BP), elevated plasma glucose, elevated blood triglyceride (TG), increased waist circumference, and low HDL cholesterol (HDL-c). Incident CHD cases included hospitalized myocardial infarction (MI), fatal CHD, revascularization procedures, and silent MI as detected by EKG. Results. The prevalence of the MetS at baseline was 29%, 30%, 40% and 26% among CHD-free white women, white men, black women, and black men, respectively. There were 1018 incident CHD cases and 1039 deaths. The relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of incident CHD associated with MetS was 2.46 (1.99, 3.03) for women and 1.86 (1.59, 2.18) for men. Clear dose-response relationship between the number of MetS components and incidence of CHD was found (P for linear trend <0.001). The following three clusters of MetS components posed the highest risk for CHD: (i) the elevated BP and glucose and low HDL-c group [RR = 5.68 (3.44, 9.37)]; (ii) the elevated BP and glucose and TG group [RR = 5.08 (2.96, 8.70)]; and (iii) the elevated BP and TG and low HDL-c group [RR = 3.98 (2.75, 5.77)]. When all five components co-existed, the risk was the highest [RR = 6.24 (4.65, 8.36)]. Similar results with attenuated RR were found for all-cause mortality. Conclusions. Individuals, especially women, with the MetS have significantly higher risk of developing CHD. The riskiest combination is high-BP and glucose clustered with low HDL-c or high TG. These data highlight the importance of targeting MetS in the prevention of CHD and premature death.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-123
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of internal medicine
Volume262
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007

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Coronary Disease
Atherosclerosis
Mortality
HDL Cholesterol
Blood Glucose
Triglycerides
Blood Pressure
Myocardial Infarction
Premature Mortality
Waist Circumference
Hypotension
Electrocardiography
Adenosine Triphosphate
Confidence Intervals
Hypertension
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

@article{419986fdac9e43669c876f8530fc381a,
title = "Metabolic syndrome, its preeminent clusters, incident coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality - Results of prospective analysis for the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study",
abstract = "Objective. To investigate the prospective association between Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease (CHD) and all-cause mortality. Subjects and Design. A bi-racial cohort of 14 699 middle-aged Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study were followed for the development of new CHD and death over a period of 9 years. MetS, using the original ATP-III criteria, was defined as having at least three of the following components: elevated blood pressure (BP), elevated plasma glucose, elevated blood triglyceride (TG), increased waist circumference, and low HDL cholesterol (HDL-c). Incident CHD cases included hospitalized myocardial infarction (MI), fatal CHD, revascularization procedures, and silent MI as detected by EKG. Results. The prevalence of the MetS at baseline was 29{\%}, 30{\%}, 40{\%} and 26{\%} among CHD-free white women, white men, black women, and black men, respectively. There were 1018 incident CHD cases and 1039 deaths. The relative risk (RR) and 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) of incident CHD associated with MetS was 2.46 (1.99, 3.03) for women and 1.86 (1.59, 2.18) for men. Clear dose-response relationship between the number of MetS components and incidence of CHD was found (P for linear trend <0.001). The following three clusters of MetS components posed the highest risk for CHD: (i) the elevated BP and glucose and low HDL-c group [RR = 5.68 (3.44, 9.37)]; (ii) the elevated BP and glucose and TG group [RR = 5.08 (2.96, 8.70)]; and (iii) the elevated BP and TG and low HDL-c group [RR = 3.98 (2.75, 5.77)]. When all five components co-existed, the risk was the highest [RR = 6.24 (4.65, 8.36)]. Similar results with attenuated RR were found for all-cause mortality. Conclusions. Individuals, especially women, with the MetS have significantly higher risk of developing CHD. The riskiest combination is high-BP and glucose clustered with low HDL-c or high TG. These data highlight the importance of targeting MetS in the prevention of CHD and premature death.",
author = "Y. Hong and X. Jin and J. Mo and Lin, {H. M.} and Y. Duan and M. Pu and Deborah Wolbrette and Duanping Liao",
year = "2007",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2796.2007.01781.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "262",
pages = "113--123",
journal = "Journal of Internal Medicine",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic syndrome, its preeminent clusters, incident coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality - Results of prospective analysis for the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study

AU - Hong, Y.

AU - Jin, X.

AU - Mo, J.

AU - Lin, H. M.

AU - Duan, Y.

AU - Pu, M.

AU - Wolbrette, Deborah

AU - Liao, Duanping

PY - 2007/7/1

Y1 - 2007/7/1

N2 - Objective. To investigate the prospective association between Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease (CHD) and all-cause mortality. Subjects and Design. A bi-racial cohort of 14 699 middle-aged Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study were followed for the development of new CHD and death over a period of 9 years. MetS, using the original ATP-III criteria, was defined as having at least three of the following components: elevated blood pressure (BP), elevated plasma glucose, elevated blood triglyceride (TG), increased waist circumference, and low HDL cholesterol (HDL-c). Incident CHD cases included hospitalized myocardial infarction (MI), fatal CHD, revascularization procedures, and silent MI as detected by EKG. Results. The prevalence of the MetS at baseline was 29%, 30%, 40% and 26% among CHD-free white women, white men, black women, and black men, respectively. There were 1018 incident CHD cases and 1039 deaths. The relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of incident CHD associated with MetS was 2.46 (1.99, 3.03) for women and 1.86 (1.59, 2.18) for men. Clear dose-response relationship between the number of MetS components and incidence of CHD was found (P for linear trend <0.001). The following three clusters of MetS components posed the highest risk for CHD: (i) the elevated BP and glucose and low HDL-c group [RR = 5.68 (3.44, 9.37)]; (ii) the elevated BP and glucose and TG group [RR = 5.08 (2.96, 8.70)]; and (iii) the elevated BP and TG and low HDL-c group [RR = 3.98 (2.75, 5.77)]. When all five components co-existed, the risk was the highest [RR = 6.24 (4.65, 8.36)]. Similar results with attenuated RR were found for all-cause mortality. Conclusions. Individuals, especially women, with the MetS have significantly higher risk of developing CHD. The riskiest combination is high-BP and glucose clustered with low HDL-c or high TG. These data highlight the importance of targeting MetS in the prevention of CHD and premature death.

AB - Objective. To investigate the prospective association between Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease (CHD) and all-cause mortality. Subjects and Design. A bi-racial cohort of 14 699 middle-aged Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study were followed for the development of new CHD and death over a period of 9 years. MetS, using the original ATP-III criteria, was defined as having at least three of the following components: elevated blood pressure (BP), elevated plasma glucose, elevated blood triglyceride (TG), increased waist circumference, and low HDL cholesterol (HDL-c). Incident CHD cases included hospitalized myocardial infarction (MI), fatal CHD, revascularization procedures, and silent MI as detected by EKG. Results. The prevalence of the MetS at baseline was 29%, 30%, 40% and 26% among CHD-free white women, white men, black women, and black men, respectively. There were 1018 incident CHD cases and 1039 deaths. The relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of incident CHD associated with MetS was 2.46 (1.99, 3.03) for women and 1.86 (1.59, 2.18) for men. Clear dose-response relationship between the number of MetS components and incidence of CHD was found (P for linear trend <0.001). The following three clusters of MetS components posed the highest risk for CHD: (i) the elevated BP and glucose and low HDL-c group [RR = 5.68 (3.44, 9.37)]; (ii) the elevated BP and glucose and TG group [RR = 5.08 (2.96, 8.70)]; and (iii) the elevated BP and TG and low HDL-c group [RR = 3.98 (2.75, 5.77)]. When all five components co-existed, the risk was the highest [RR = 6.24 (4.65, 8.36)]. Similar results with attenuated RR were found for all-cause mortality. Conclusions. Individuals, especially women, with the MetS have significantly higher risk of developing CHD. The riskiest combination is high-BP and glucose clustered with low HDL-c or high TG. These data highlight the importance of targeting MetS in the prevention of CHD and premature death.

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