Metacognitive monitoring in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury

Kathy S. Chiou, Richard Alan Carlson, Peter Andrew Arnett, Stephanie A. Cosentino, Frank Gerard Hillary

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability to engage in self-reflective processes is a capacity that may be disrupted after neurological compromise; research to date has demonstrated that patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) show reduced awareness of their deficits and functional ability compared to caretaker or clinician reports. Assessment of awareness of deficit, however, has been limited by the use of subjective measures (without comparison to actual performance) that are susceptible to report bias. This study used concurrent measurements from cognitive testing and confidence judgments about performance to investigate in-the-moment metacognitive experiences after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Deficits in metacognitive accuracy were found in adults with TBI for some but not all indices, suggesting that metacognition may not be a unitary construct. Findings also revealed that not all indices of executive functioning reliably predict metacognitive ability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)720-731
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Aptitude
Cohort Studies
Research
Metacognition
Traumatic Brain Injury

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Metacognitive monitoring in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. / Chiou, Kathy S.; Carlson, Richard Alan; Arnett, Peter Andrew; Cosentino, Stephanie A.; Hillary, Frank Gerard.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.01.2011, p. 720-731.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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