Metaphorically feeling

Comprehending textural metaphors activates somatosensory cortex

Simon Lacey, Randall Stilla, Krishnankutty Sathian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conceptual metaphor theory suggests that knowledge is structured around metaphorical mappings derived from physical experience. Segregated processing of object properties in sensory cortex allows testing of the hypothesis that metaphor processing recruits activity in domain-specific sensory cortex. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) we show that texture-selective somatosensory cortex in the parietal operculum is activated when processing sentences containing textural metaphors, compared to literal sentences matched for meaning. This finding supports the idea that comprehension of metaphors is perceptually grounded.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)416-421
Number of pages6
JournalBrain and Language
Volume120
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

Fingerprint

Metaphor
Somatosensory Cortex
metaphor
Emotions
comprehension
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Cortex
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

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Metaphorically feeling : Comprehending textural metaphors activates somatosensory cortex. / Lacey, Simon; Stilla, Randall; Sathian, Krishnankutty.

In: Brain and Language, Vol. 120, No. 3, 01.03.2012, p. 416-421.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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