Metascience: Guidelines for the Practitioner

John R. Turner, H. Quincy Brown, David Lynn Passmore, Kim Nimon, Rose Baker, Shinhee Jeong, Candace Flatt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Problem: The trend in current research is to seek a statistically significant finding, one that provides a p value less than a predetermined alpha. Unfortunately, a large number of research studies have been identified as being nonreplicable along with having other shortcomings (low power, improper methodology, poor sample size) that reduce the rigor of a study’s research findings. Additional techniques are needed beyond relying solely on a p value. The Solution: This article presents recommendations that Human Resource Development (HRD) scholars and scholar-practitioners can implement to improve the rigor of the discipline’s research and practice. This article also provides guidelines (higher power, meta-analyses, low bias in large studies) of how to best avoid producing nonreplicability studies along with recommendations for the larger field, in this instance for scholars and scholar-practitioners in the social sciences. The Stakeholders: Scholars, scholar-practitioners, employees, and researchers who are impacted by changes in their environment due to less-than rigorous evidence-based research findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-512
Number of pages10
JournalAdvances in Developing Human Resources
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

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Scholar-practitioner
P value
Employees
Sample size
Stakeholders
Social sciences
Evidence-based
Methodology
Human resource development

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

Turner, J. R., Brown, H. Q., Passmore, D. L., Nimon, K., Baker, R., Jeong, S., & Flatt, C. (2019). Metascience: Guidelines for the Practitioner. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 21(4), 503-512. https://doi.org/10.1177/1523422319870790
Turner, John R. ; Brown, H. Quincy ; Passmore, David Lynn ; Nimon, Kim ; Baker, Rose ; Jeong, Shinhee ; Flatt, Candace. / Metascience : Guidelines for the Practitioner. In: Advances in Developing Human Resources. 2019 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 503-512.
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Turner, JR, Brown, HQ, Passmore, DL, Nimon, K, Baker, R, Jeong, S & Flatt, C 2019, 'Metascience: Guidelines for the Practitioner', Advances in Developing Human Resources, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 503-512. https://doi.org/10.1177/1523422319870790

Metascience : Guidelines for the Practitioner. / Turner, John R.; Brown, H. Quincy; Passmore, David Lynn; Nimon, Kim; Baker, Rose; Jeong, Shinhee; Flatt, Candace.

In: Advances in Developing Human Resources, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.11.2019, p. 503-512.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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