Method for Flux-Chamber Measurement of Ammonia Volatilization From Putting Greens Foliarly-Fertilized by Urea

Maxim J. Schlossberg, Benjamin A. McGraw, Kyle R. Hivner, Derek T. Pruyne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Foliar fertilization is an increasingly popular method of ensuring golf course putting green nitrogen (N) sufficiency in season. The low cost, high N-content, and favorable handling characteristics of urea (46-0-0) make it a common N-source in foliar treatments of horticultural crops. While numerous investigations confirm incomplete recovery of foliarly-applied urea-N by turfgrass, few field assessments of NH3 volatilization from greens have been conducted. Meanwhile, NH3 emissions reduce air quality and contribute to non-point nutrient loading of water resources. The research objectives were to (i) develop a method for field-implementation of closed dynamic/flux chambers to measure NH3 volatilization from 0 to 24 h following foliar application of urea-N to putting greens; and (ii) infer the significance of flux chamber NH3-N volatilization measures relative to levels arising from simultaneous static-chamber measures. Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L. “Penn G-2”) putting greens were foliarly treated by 20–44 kg urea-N ha−1 from 2013 to 2015, and NH3 volatilization measured using H3BO3 trap-equipped flux and/or static chamber systems. Flux chamber measures of NH3 volatilization accounted for 7.1% of the urea-N fertilizer applied 24 h previous. Simultaneous static chamber measures of NH3 volatilization were an order of magnitude less. A replicated flux chamber trapping efficiency trial showed 63% mean NH3 recovery. Thus under the duration and conditions described, 7.1–11.2% of foliar urea-N applications can be expected to volatilize from putting greens. Regarding closed chamber system measurement of NH3 volatilization from small field plots, the described flux chambers afford applied scientists a more precise and efficient method than static chambers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1700085
JournalClean - Soil, Air, Water
Volume45
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Fingerprint

flux chamber
volatilization
Vaporization
Ammonia
Urea
urea
ammonia
Fluxes
Recovery
golf course
Fertilizers
method
Water resources
Air quality
Nutrients
Crops
trapping
air quality
Nitrogen
water resource

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Pollution

Cite this

@article{032043fbe95d4562855f28ddb628f281,
title = "Method for Flux-Chamber Measurement of Ammonia Volatilization From Putting Greens Foliarly-Fertilized by Urea",
abstract = "Foliar fertilization is an increasingly popular method of ensuring golf course putting green nitrogen (N) sufficiency in season. The low cost, high N-content, and favorable handling characteristics of urea (46-0-0) make it a common N-source in foliar treatments of horticultural crops. While numerous investigations confirm incomplete recovery of foliarly-applied urea-N by turfgrass, few field assessments of NH3 volatilization from greens have been conducted. Meanwhile, NH3 emissions reduce air quality and contribute to non-point nutrient loading of water resources. The research objectives were to (i) develop a method for field-implementation of closed dynamic/flux chambers to measure NH3 volatilization from 0 to 24 h following foliar application of urea-N to putting greens; and (ii) infer the significance of flux chamber NH3-N volatilization measures relative to levels arising from simultaneous static-chamber measures. Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L. “Penn G-2”) putting greens were foliarly treated by 20–44 kg urea-N ha−1 from 2013 to 2015, and NH3 volatilization measured using H3BO3 trap-equipped flux and/or static chamber systems. Flux chamber measures of NH3 volatilization accounted for 7.1{\%} of the urea-N fertilizer applied 24 h previous. Simultaneous static chamber measures of NH3 volatilization were an order of magnitude less. A replicated flux chamber trapping efficiency trial showed 63{\%} mean NH3 recovery. Thus under the duration and conditions described, 7.1–11.2{\%} of foliar urea-N applications can be expected to volatilize from putting greens. Regarding closed chamber system measurement of NH3 volatilization from small field plots, the described flux chambers afford applied scientists a more precise and efficient method than static chambers.",
author = "Schlossberg, {Maxim J.} and McGraw, {Benjamin A.} and Hivner, {Kyle R.} and Pruyne, {Derek T.}",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/clen.201700085",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "45",
journal = "Clean - Soil, Air, Water",
issn = "1863-0650",
publisher = "Wiley-VCH Verlag",
number = "9",

}

Method for Flux-Chamber Measurement of Ammonia Volatilization From Putting Greens Foliarly-Fertilized by Urea. / Schlossberg, Maxim J.; McGraw, Benjamin A.; Hivner, Kyle R.; Pruyne, Derek T.

In: Clean - Soil, Air, Water, Vol. 45, No. 9, 1700085, 01.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Method for Flux-Chamber Measurement of Ammonia Volatilization From Putting Greens Foliarly-Fertilized by Urea

AU - Schlossberg, Maxim J.

AU - McGraw, Benjamin A.

AU - Hivner, Kyle R.

AU - Pruyne, Derek T.

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - Foliar fertilization is an increasingly popular method of ensuring golf course putting green nitrogen (N) sufficiency in season. The low cost, high N-content, and favorable handling characteristics of urea (46-0-0) make it a common N-source in foliar treatments of horticultural crops. While numerous investigations confirm incomplete recovery of foliarly-applied urea-N by turfgrass, few field assessments of NH3 volatilization from greens have been conducted. Meanwhile, NH3 emissions reduce air quality and contribute to non-point nutrient loading of water resources. The research objectives were to (i) develop a method for field-implementation of closed dynamic/flux chambers to measure NH3 volatilization from 0 to 24 h following foliar application of urea-N to putting greens; and (ii) infer the significance of flux chamber NH3-N volatilization measures relative to levels arising from simultaneous static-chamber measures. Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L. “Penn G-2”) putting greens were foliarly treated by 20–44 kg urea-N ha−1 from 2013 to 2015, and NH3 volatilization measured using H3BO3 trap-equipped flux and/or static chamber systems. Flux chamber measures of NH3 volatilization accounted for 7.1% of the urea-N fertilizer applied 24 h previous. Simultaneous static chamber measures of NH3 volatilization were an order of magnitude less. A replicated flux chamber trapping efficiency trial showed 63% mean NH3 recovery. Thus under the duration and conditions described, 7.1–11.2% of foliar urea-N applications can be expected to volatilize from putting greens. Regarding closed chamber system measurement of NH3 volatilization from small field plots, the described flux chambers afford applied scientists a more precise and efficient method than static chambers.

AB - Foliar fertilization is an increasingly popular method of ensuring golf course putting green nitrogen (N) sufficiency in season. The low cost, high N-content, and favorable handling characteristics of urea (46-0-0) make it a common N-source in foliar treatments of horticultural crops. While numerous investigations confirm incomplete recovery of foliarly-applied urea-N by turfgrass, few field assessments of NH3 volatilization from greens have been conducted. Meanwhile, NH3 emissions reduce air quality and contribute to non-point nutrient loading of water resources. The research objectives were to (i) develop a method for field-implementation of closed dynamic/flux chambers to measure NH3 volatilization from 0 to 24 h following foliar application of urea-N to putting greens; and (ii) infer the significance of flux chamber NH3-N volatilization measures relative to levels arising from simultaneous static-chamber measures. Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L. “Penn G-2”) putting greens were foliarly treated by 20–44 kg urea-N ha−1 from 2013 to 2015, and NH3 volatilization measured using H3BO3 trap-equipped flux and/or static chamber systems. Flux chamber measures of NH3 volatilization accounted for 7.1% of the urea-N fertilizer applied 24 h previous. Simultaneous static chamber measures of NH3 volatilization were an order of magnitude less. A replicated flux chamber trapping efficiency trial showed 63% mean NH3 recovery. Thus under the duration and conditions described, 7.1–11.2% of foliar urea-N applications can be expected to volatilize from putting greens. Regarding closed chamber system measurement of NH3 volatilization from small field plots, the described flux chambers afford applied scientists a more precise and efficient method than static chambers.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85026459590&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85026459590&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/clen.201700085

DO - 10.1002/clen.201700085

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85026459590

VL - 45

JO - Clean - Soil, Air, Water

JF - Clean - Soil, Air, Water

SN - 1863-0650

IS - 9

M1 - 1700085

ER -