Method matters: The influence of methodology on journalists' assessments of social science research

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Journalists make frequent use of social science research in news stories, and this information can help shape public opinion and policy. Despite this, few scholars have examined how this coverage is assembled. In particular, researchers have rarely considered how the methodology of social science influences journalists' judgments. This article uses an experimental design embedded within an e-mail survey of working journalists to compare judgments of a qualitative and quantitative study. Results show journalists consider the quantitative study more accurate and newsworthy. The article considers how focusing on N and other basic aspects of methodology might influence coverage patterns and distort representations of social science research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-287
Number of pages19
JournalScience Communication
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

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journalist
social science
methodology
coverage
mail survey
e-mail
public opinion
news
public policy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Method matters : The influence of methodology on journalists' assessments of social science research. / Schmierbach, Michael Grant.

In: Science Communication, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.03.2005, p. 269-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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