Methodology for study of human-robot social interaction in dangerous situations

David J. Atkinson, Micah Clark

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Applications of robotics in dangerous domains such as search and rescue require new methodology for study of humanrobot interaction. Perceived danger evokes unique human psycho-physiological factors that influence perception, cognition and behavior. Human first responders are trained for victim psychology. Apart from real-life instances of disasters, studies of robots in this environment are difficult to perform safely and systematically with sufficient controls, fidelity, and in a manner that permits exact replication. Consequently, the trend to deploy rescue robots, for example, is proceeding largely without benefit of knowing whether human victims will readily cooperate with robot rescuers. The capability to deal with unique victim psychology has not been a testable requirement. We report on the methodology of an on-going study that uses virtual reality to provide a feature-rich immersive environment that is sufficient to evoke fear-related psychological response, provides simulation capability for robots, and enables systematic study trials with automated data collection via an embedded scripting language. The methodology presented provides an effective way to study human interaction with intelligent agents embodied as robots in application domains that would otherwise be impossible in the real world.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHAI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages371-376
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781450330350
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 29 2014
Event2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction, HAI 2014 - Tsukuba, Japan
Duration: Oct 29 2014Oct 31 2014

Publication series

NameHAI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction

Conference

Conference2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction, HAI 2014
CountryJapan
CityTsukuba
Period10/29/1410/31/14

Fingerprint

Robots
Intelligent agents
Disasters
Virtual reality
Robotics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software

Cite this

Atkinson, D. J., & Clark, M. (2014). Methodology for study of human-robot social interaction in dangerous situations. In HAI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction (pp. 371-376). (HAI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/2658861.2658871
Atkinson, David J. ; Clark, Micah. / Methodology for study of human-robot social interaction in dangerous situations. HAI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2014. pp. 371-376 (HAI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction).
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Atkinson, DJ & Clark, M 2014, Methodology for study of human-robot social interaction in dangerous situations. in HAI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction. HAI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 371-376, 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction, HAI 2014, Tsukuba, Japan, 10/29/14. https://doi.org/10.1145/2658861.2658871

Methodology for study of human-robot social interaction in dangerous situations. / Atkinson, David J.; Clark, Micah.

HAI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2014. p. 371-376 (HAI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Atkinson DJ, Clark M. Methodology for study of human-robot social interaction in dangerous situations. In HAI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 2014. p. 371-376. (HAI 2014 - Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Human-Agent Interaction). https://doi.org/10.1145/2658861.2658871