Methods of analysis of enteropathogen infection in the MAL-ED cohort study

MAL-ED Network Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies of diarrheal etiology in low-and middle-income countries have typically focused on children presenting with severe symptoms to health centers and thus are best equipped to describe the pathogens capable of leading to severe diarrheal disease. The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study was designed to evaluate, via intensive community surveillance, the hypothesis that repeated exposure to enteropathogens has a detrimental effect on growth, vaccine response, and cognitive development, which are the primary outcome measures for this study. In the setting of multiple outcomes of interest, a longitudinal cohort design was chosen. Because many or even the majority of enteric infections are asymptomatic, the collection of asymptomatic surveillance stools was a critical element. However, capturing diarrheal stools additionally allowed for the determination of the principle causes of diarrhea at the community level as well as for a comparison between those enteropathogens associated with diarrhea and those that are associated with poor growth, diminished vaccine response, and impaired cognitive development. Here, we discuss the analytical methods proposed for the MAL-ED study to determine the principal causes of diarrhea at the community level and describe the complex interplay between recurrent exposure to enteropathogens and these critical long-term outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S233-S238
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume59
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2014

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Diarrhea
Cohort Studies
Vaccines
Infection
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Asymptomatic Infections
Growth
Child Development
Malnutrition
Health
Child Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

MAL-ED Network Investigators. / Methods of analysis of enteropathogen infection in the MAL-ED cohort study. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2014 ; Vol. 59. pp. S233-S238.
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abstract = "Studies of diarrheal etiology in low-and middle-income countries have typically focused on children presenting with severe symptoms to health centers and thus are best equipped to describe the pathogens capable of leading to severe diarrheal disease. The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) cohort study was designed to evaluate, via intensive community surveillance, the hypothesis that repeated exposure to enteropathogens has a detrimental effect on growth, vaccine response, and cognitive development, which are the primary outcome measures for this study. In the setting of multiple outcomes of interest, a longitudinal cohort design was chosen. Because many or even the majority of enteric infections are asymptomatic, the collection of asymptomatic surveillance stools was a critical element. However, capturing diarrheal stools additionally allowed for the determination of the principle causes of diarrhea at the community level as well as for a comparison between those enteropathogens associated with diarrhea and those that are associated with poor growth, diminished vaccine response, and impaired cognitive development. Here, we discuss the analytical methods proposed for the MAL-ED study to determine the principal causes of diarrhea at the community level and describe the complex interplay between recurrent exposure to enteropathogens and these critical long-term outcomes.",
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Methods of analysis of enteropathogen infection in the MAL-ED cohort study. / MAL-ED Network Investigators.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 59, 01.11.2014, p. S233-S238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Methods of analysis of enteropathogen infection in the MAL-ED cohort study

AU - MAL-ED Network Investigators

AU - Platts-Mills, James A.

AU - McCormick, Benjamin J.J.

AU - Kosek, Margaret

AU - Pan, William K.

AU - Checkley, William

AU - Houpt, Eric R.

AU - Acosta, Angel Mendez

AU - de Burga, Rosa Rios

AU - Chavez, Cesar Banda

AU - Flores, Julian Torres

AU - Olotegui, Maribel Paredes

AU - Pinedo, Silvia Rengifo

AU - Salas, Mery Siguas

AU - Trigoso, Dixner Rengifo

AU - Vasquez, Angel Orbe

AU - Ahmed, Imran

AU - Alam, Didar

AU - Ali, Asad

AU - Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.

AU - Qureshi, Shahida

AU - Rasheed, Muneera

AU - Soofi, Sajid

AU - Turab, Ali

AU - Zaidi, Anita K.M.

AU - Bodhidatta, Ladaporn

AU - Mason, Carl J.

AU - Babji, Sudhir

AU - Bose, Anuradha

AU - George, Ajila T.

AU - Hariraju, Dinesh

AU - Jennifer, M. Steffi

AU - John, Sushil

AU - Kaki, Shiny

AU - Kang, Gagandeep

AU - Karunakaran, Priyadarshani

AU - Koshy, Beena

AU - Lazarus, Robin P.

AU - Muliyil, Jayaprakash

AU - Raghava, Mohan Venkata

AU - Raju, Sophy

AU - Ramachandran, Anup

AU - Ramadas, Rakhi

AU - Ramanujam, Karthikeyan

AU - Bose, Anuradha

AU - Roshan, Reeba

AU - Sharma, Srujan L.

AU - Shanmuga Sundaram, E.

AU - Murray-Kolb, Laura E.

AU - Ross, A. Catharine

AU - Schaefer, Barbara

PY - 2014/11/1

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