Metonymy and the metropolis: Television show settings and the image of New York City

William J. Sadler, Ekaterina Haskins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article argues that contemporary portrayals of cityscapes on television create a "postcard effect," a way of seeing that affords the viewer the pleasureofa tourist gaze. This disposition both reflects and legitimizes a fragmented experience of visiting a location without immersing oneself in the intricacies of its politics and geography. Building on critical urban studies, film theory, semiotics, and critical ethnography, this article analyzes depictions of New York City in five television shows (Seinfeld, Friends, Sex and the City, Felicity, and The Sopranos) to demonstrate how metonymic representations of the city produce a narrative of a tourist destination on display.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-216
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Communication Inquiry
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Fingerprint

television show
metropolis
Television
tourist
Semiotics
semiotics
disposition
ethnography
television
Display devices
geography
narrative
politics
experience
Metropolis
Metonymy
Tourists
Critical Ethnography
Portrayal
Film Theory

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

@article{dcd50f9a5cfb4e0c99573326bd1bdea7,
title = "Metonymy and the metropolis: Television show settings and the image of New York City",
abstract = "This article argues that contemporary portrayals of cityscapes on television create a {"}postcard effect,{"} a way of seeing that affords the viewer the pleasureofa tourist gaze. This disposition both reflects and legitimizes a fragmented experience of visiting a location without immersing oneself in the intricacies of its politics and geography. Building on critical urban studies, film theory, semiotics, and critical ethnography, this article analyzes depictions of New York City in five television shows (Seinfeld, Friends, Sex and the City, Felicity, and The Sopranos) to demonstrate how metonymic representations of the city produce a narrative of a tourist destination on display.",
author = "Sadler, {William J.} and Ekaterina Haskins",
year = "2005",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0196859905275971",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "195--216",
journal = "Journal of Communication Inquiry",
issn = "0196-8599",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "3",

}

Metonymy and the metropolis : Television show settings and the image of New York City. / Sadler, William J.; Haskins, Ekaterina.

In: Journal of Communication Inquiry, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.12.2005, p. 195-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metonymy and the metropolis

T2 - Television show settings and the image of New York City

AU - Sadler, William J.

AU - Haskins, Ekaterina

PY - 2005/12/1

Y1 - 2005/12/1

N2 - This article argues that contemporary portrayals of cityscapes on television create a "postcard effect," a way of seeing that affords the viewer the pleasureofa tourist gaze. This disposition both reflects and legitimizes a fragmented experience of visiting a location without immersing oneself in the intricacies of its politics and geography. Building on critical urban studies, film theory, semiotics, and critical ethnography, this article analyzes depictions of New York City in five television shows (Seinfeld, Friends, Sex and the City, Felicity, and The Sopranos) to demonstrate how metonymic representations of the city produce a narrative of a tourist destination on display.

AB - This article argues that contemporary portrayals of cityscapes on television create a "postcard effect," a way of seeing that affords the viewer the pleasureofa tourist gaze. This disposition both reflects and legitimizes a fragmented experience of visiting a location without immersing oneself in the intricacies of its politics and geography. Building on critical urban studies, film theory, semiotics, and critical ethnography, this article analyzes depictions of New York City in five television shows (Seinfeld, Friends, Sex and the City, Felicity, and The Sopranos) to demonstrate how metonymic representations of the city produce a narrative of a tourist destination on display.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=61049185802&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=61049185802&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0196859905275971

DO - 10.1177/0196859905275971

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:61049185802

VL - 29

SP - 195

EP - 216

JO - Journal of Communication Inquiry

JF - Journal of Communication Inquiry

SN - 0196-8599

IS - 3

ER -