METROPOLITAN FRAGMENTATION AND SUBURBAN GHETTOS

Some Empirical Observations on Institutional Racism

Ruth Hoogland DeHoog, David Lynn Lowery, William E. Lyons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Are citizens in predominantly black neighborhoods or communities better off with public services provided by a consolidated government where blacks are in the minority than when they control municipal government in an autonomous suburban setting? This paper reports using a comparison group design to investigate four hypotheses: that blacks in predominantly black suburbs in a fragmented environment (1) enjoy more services, (2) evidence lower dissatisfaction with services, (3) are less disaffected, and (4) participate more than minorities in a consolidated government. Contrary to public choice expectations, the findings indicate substantial evidence for traditional reformers' beliefs in the advantages of consolidated government.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-493
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Urban Affairs
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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racism
ghetto
fragmentation
minority
public choice
public service
suburb
evidence
citizen
community
Group
services

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

DeHoog, Ruth Hoogland ; Lowery, David Lynn ; Lyons, William E. / METROPOLITAN FRAGMENTATION AND SUBURBAN GHETTOS : Some Empirical Observations on Institutional Racism. In: Journal of Urban Affairs. 1991 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 479-493.
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METROPOLITAN FRAGMENTATION AND SUBURBAN GHETTOS : Some Empirical Observations on Institutional Racism. / DeHoog, Ruth Hoogland; Lowery, David Lynn; Lyons, William E.

In: Journal of Urban Affairs, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.01.1991, p. 479-493.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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