METROPOLITAN FRAGMENTATION AND SUBURBAN GHETTOS: Some Empirical Observations on Institutional Racism

Ruth Hoogland DeHoog, David Lowery, William E. Lyons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Are citizens in predominantly black neighborhoods or communities better off with public services provided by a consolidated government where blacks are in the minority than when they control municipal government in an autonomous suburban setting? This paper reports using a comparison group design to investigate four hypotheses: that blacks in predominantly black suburbs in a fragmented environment (1) enjoy more services, (2) evidence lower dissatisfaction with services, (3) are less disaffected, and (4) participate more than minorities in a consolidated government. Contrary to public choice expectations, the findings indicate substantial evidence for traditional reformers' beliefs in the advantages of consolidated government.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-493
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Urban Affairs
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1991

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'METROPOLITAN FRAGMENTATION AND SUBURBAN GHETTOS: Some Empirical Observations on Institutional Racism'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this