Microbial competition in polar soils: A review of an understudied but potentially important control on productivity

Terrence H. Bell, Katrina L. Callender, Lyle G. Whyte, Charles W. Greer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intermicrobial competition is known to occur in many natural environments, and can result from direct conflict between organisms, or from differential rates of growth, colonization, and/or nutrient acquisition. It has been difficult to extensively examine intermicrobial competition in situ, but these interactions may play an important role in the regulation of the many biogeochemical processes that are tied to microbial communities in polar soils. A greater understanding of how competition influences productivity will improve projections of gas and nutrient flux as the poles warm, may provide biotechnological opportunities for increasing the degradation of contaminants in polar soil, and will help to predict changes in communities of higher organisms, such as plants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)533-554
Number of pages22
JournalBiology
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 27 2013

Fingerprint

microbial competition
Soil
Productivity
Soils
Nutrients
organisms
nutrients
microbial communities
soil
Gases
gases
Food
degradation
Poles
Growth
Impurities
Fluxes
Degradation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Bell, Terrence H. ; Callender, Katrina L. ; Whyte, Lyle G. ; Greer, Charles W. / Microbial competition in polar soils : A review of an understudied but potentially important control on productivity. In: Biology. 2013 ; Vol. 2, No. 2. pp. 533-554.
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Microbial competition in polar soils : A review of an understudied but potentially important control on productivity. / Bell, Terrence H.; Callender, Katrina L.; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

In: Biology, Vol. 2, No. 2, 27.03.2013, p. 533-554.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T2 - A review of an understudied but potentially important control on productivity

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AU - Callender, Katrina L.

AU - Whyte, Lyle G.

AU - Greer, Charles W.

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N2 - Intermicrobial competition is known to occur in many natural environments, and can result from direct conflict between organisms, or from differential rates of growth, colonization, and/or nutrient acquisition. It has been difficult to extensively examine intermicrobial competition in situ, but these interactions may play an important role in the regulation of the many biogeochemical processes that are tied to microbial communities in polar soils. A greater understanding of how competition influences productivity will improve projections of gas and nutrient flux as the poles warm, may provide biotechnological opportunities for increasing the degradation of contaminants in polar soil, and will help to predict changes in communities of higher organisms, such as plants.

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