Microcontact insertion printing

Thomas J. Mullen, Charan Srinivasan, J. Nathan Hohman, Susan D. Gillmor, Mitchell J. Shuster, Mark William Horn, Anne M. Andrews, Paul S. Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors describe a chemical patterning technique, "microcontact insertion printing," that utilizes conventional microcontact printing to pattern isolated molecules diluted within a preexisting self-assembled monolayer. By modifying the preexisting monolayer quality, the stamping duration, and/or the concentration of the patterned molecule, they can influence the extent of molecular exchange and precisely control the molecular composition of patterned self-assembled monolayers. This simple methodology can be used to fabricate complex patterns via multiple stamping steps and has applications ranging from bioselective surfaces to molecular-scale electronic components.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number063114
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume90
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 19 2007

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stamping
printing
insertion
molecules
methodology
electronics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Mullen, T. J., Srinivasan, C., Hohman, J. N., Gillmor, S. D., Shuster, M. J., Horn, M. W., ... Weiss, P. S. (2007). Microcontact insertion printing. Applied Physics Letters, 90(6), [063114]. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2457525
Mullen, Thomas J. ; Srinivasan, Charan ; Hohman, J. Nathan ; Gillmor, Susan D. ; Shuster, Mitchell J. ; Horn, Mark William ; Andrews, Anne M. ; Weiss, Paul S. / Microcontact insertion printing. In: Applied Physics Letters. 2007 ; Vol. 90, No. 6.
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Mullen, TJ, Srinivasan, C, Hohman, JN, Gillmor, SD, Shuster, MJ, Horn, MW, Andrews, AM & Weiss, PS 2007, 'Microcontact insertion printing', Applied Physics Letters, vol. 90, no. 6, 063114. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2457525

Microcontact insertion printing. / Mullen, Thomas J.; Srinivasan, Charan; Hohman, J. Nathan; Gillmor, Susan D.; Shuster, Mitchell J.; Horn, Mark William; Andrews, Anne M.; Weiss, Paul S.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 90, No. 6, 063114, 19.02.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Weiss, Paul S.

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Mullen TJ, Srinivasan C, Hohman JN, Gillmor SD, Shuster MJ, Horn MW et al. Microcontact insertion printing. Applied Physics Letters. 2007 Feb 19;90(6). 063114. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2457525