Microstructural evolution of diamond growth during HFCVD

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to study nucleation and growth mechanism of diamond by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. A novel technique has shown a direct evidence for the formation of the diamond-like carbon layer 8-14 nm thick in which small diamond micro-crystallites were embedded. These diamond micro-crystallites were formed as a result of transformation of diamond-like carbon into diamond. The diamond micro-crystallites present in the amorphous diamond-like carbon layer provided nucleation sites for diamond growth. Large diamond crystallites were observed to grow from these micro-crystallites. The mechanism of diamond growth will be presented based on experimental findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3197-3208
Number of pages12
JournalActa Metallurgica et Materialia
Volume42
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

Fingerprint

Diamond
Microstructural evolution
Chemical vapor deposition
Diamonds
Crystallites
Carbon
Nucleation
High resolution transmission electron microscopy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

@article{b370cada3b7c46cbb8283426e9cbe3db,
title = "Microstructural evolution of diamond growth during HFCVD",
abstract = "High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to study nucleation and growth mechanism of diamond by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. A novel technique has shown a direct evidence for the formation of the diamond-like carbon layer 8-14 nm thick in which small diamond micro-crystallites were embedded. These diamond micro-crystallites were formed as a result of transformation of diamond-like carbon into diamond. The diamond micro-crystallites present in the amorphous diamond-like carbon layer provided nucleation sites for diamond growth. Large diamond crystallites were observed to grow from these micro-crystallites. The mechanism of diamond growth will be presented based on experimental findings.",
author = "Jogender Singh",
year = "1994",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0956-7151(94)90418-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "42",
pages = "3197--3208",
journal = "Acta Materialia",
issn = "1359-6454",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "9",

}

Microstructural evolution of diamond growth during HFCVD. / Singh, Jogender.

In: Acta Metallurgica et Materialia, Vol. 42, No. 9, 01.01.1994, p. 3197-3208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Microstructural evolution of diamond growth during HFCVD

AU - Singh, Jogender

PY - 1994/1/1

Y1 - 1994/1/1

N2 - High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to study nucleation and growth mechanism of diamond by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. A novel technique has shown a direct evidence for the formation of the diamond-like carbon layer 8-14 nm thick in which small diamond micro-crystallites were embedded. These diamond micro-crystallites were formed as a result of transformation of diamond-like carbon into diamond. The diamond micro-crystallites present in the amorphous diamond-like carbon layer provided nucleation sites for diamond growth. Large diamond crystallites were observed to grow from these micro-crystallites. The mechanism of diamond growth will be presented based on experimental findings.

AB - High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to study nucleation and growth mechanism of diamond by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. A novel technique has shown a direct evidence for the formation of the diamond-like carbon layer 8-14 nm thick in which small diamond micro-crystallites were embedded. These diamond micro-crystallites were formed as a result of transformation of diamond-like carbon into diamond. The diamond micro-crystallites present in the amorphous diamond-like carbon layer provided nucleation sites for diamond growth. Large diamond crystallites were observed to grow from these micro-crystallites. The mechanism of diamond growth will be presented based on experimental findings.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028501127&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028501127&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0956-7151(94)90418-9

DO - 10.1016/0956-7151(94)90418-9

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0028501127

VL - 42

SP - 3197

EP - 3208

JO - Acta Materialia

JF - Acta Materialia

SN - 1359-6454

IS - 9

ER -