Migraine and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: A single-institution review

M. Teixido, A. Baker, Huseyin Isildak

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and migraine-associated dizziness are common. The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo seems to be higher in patients with migraine-associated dizziness than in those without migraine. Methods: A database of 508 patients seen at the primary author's balance clinic was analysed to determine the prevalence of migraine, as defined by International Headache Society criteria, in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Results: The percentage of patients with dizziness or vertigo who met criteria for migraine was 33.7 per cent, with a prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of 42.3 per cent. When excluding patients with migrainous vertigo, patients with migraine frequently had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (66.7 per cent vs 55.8 per cent), although this finding was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The results for the entire sample suggest that, after excluding patients with migrainous vertigo, patients with migraine seem more likely to have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; however, this association was not significant, probably because of the small sample size.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)508-513
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Laryngology and Otology
Volume131
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Migraine Disorders
Vertigo
Dizziness
Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
Sample Size
Headache
Databases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and migraine-associated dizziness are common. The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo seems to be higher in patients with migraine-associated dizziness than in those without migraine. Methods: A database of 508 patients seen at the primary author's balance clinic was analysed to determine the prevalence of migraine, as defined by International Headache Society criteria, in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Results: The percentage of patients with dizziness or vertigo who met criteria for migraine was 33.7 per cent, with a prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of 42.3 per cent. When excluding patients with migrainous vertigo, patients with migraine frequently had benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (66.7 per cent vs 55.8 per cent), although this finding was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The results for the entire sample suggest that, after excluding patients with migrainous vertigo, patients with migraine seem more likely to have benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; however, this association was not significant, probably because of the small sample size.",
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Migraine and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo : A single-institution review. / Teixido, M.; Baker, A.; Isildak, Huseyin.

In: Journal of Laryngology and Otology, Vol. 131, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 508-513.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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