Migration Timing and Parenting Practices: Contributions to Social Development in Preschoolers With Foreign-Born and Native-Born Mothers

Jennifer Elyse Glick, Laura D. Hanish, Scott Thomas Yabiku, Robert H. Bradley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little is known about how key aspects of parental migration or childrearing history affect social development across children from immigrant families. Relying on data on approximately 6,400 children from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort, analyses assessed the role of mother's age at migration on children's social development in the United States (sociability and problem behaviors). Consistent with models of divergent adaptation and assimilation, the relation between age at arrival and children's social development is not linear. Parenting practices, observed when children were approximately 24months of age, partially mediated the relation between mother's age at arrival and children's social development reported at approximate age 48months, particularly in the case of mothers who arrived as adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1527-1542
Number of pages16
JournalChild development
Volume83
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Migration Timing and Parenting Practices: Contributions to Social Development in Preschoolers With Foreign-Born and Native-Born Mothers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this