Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-concussion Syndrome

Harry Bramley, Justin Hong, J. Christopher Zacko, Christopher Royer, Matthew Silvis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sport-related concussion typically resolves within a few weeks of the injury; however, persistent symptoms have been reported to occur in 10% to 15% of concussions. These ongoing symptoms can cause significant disability and be frustrating for the patient and family. In addition, factors other than brain injury can cause complications for these patients, such as adjustment disorder or exacerbation of preexisting conditions such as depression or migraine. Individuals with prolonged symptoms of concussion may be classified as having post-concussion syndrome. A careful and thoughtful evaluation is important, as the clinician must determine whether these prolonged symptoms reflect brain injury pathophysiology versus another process. Although there have been numerous studies on the acute management of concussion, much less is available on the treatment of persistent disease. This review will provide an evaluation approach for the patient with prolonged concussion symptoms and review recent literature on treatment strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-129
Number of pages7
JournalSports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Post-Concussion Syndrome
Brain Concussion
Brain Injuries
Adjustment Disorders
Preexisting Condition Coverage
Migraine Disorders
Sports
Depression
Wounds and Injuries
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-concussion Syndrome. / Bramley, Harry; Hong, Justin; Zacko, J. Christopher; Royer, Christopher; Silvis, Matthew.

In: Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review, Vol. 24, No. 3, 01.09.2016, p. 123-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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