Minería y relaciones comunitarias en el Perú: ¿Se puede llegar a un acuerdo?

Translated title of the contribution: Mining and community relations in Peru: can agreement be reached?

Oswaldo Morales, Andrew Nathan Kleit, Gareth H. Rees

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to introduce a country’s mixed history of colonialism and cultural heritage as a background to the management of a mining company’s community engagement. Mining-related social conflicts have intensified in Peru as mining expansion challenges Andean people’s traditional livelihoods. It is generally thought that resolving such conflicts requires a set of long-term strategies and engagement. Design/methodology/approach: The case study has been developed using an inductive methodology through content analysis of newspaper reports, official documents and the academic literature. It follows a complex and evolving situation, blending social and cultural theory and norms with actual events to provide insight into the conflicts’ historical, social and cultural forces. Findings: Mining conflicts are complex business and strategic problems that call for a more thorough analysis of causal variables and a deeper understanding of the underlying cultural and historical forces. Transactional community engagement responses may not always be adequate to maintain a mining project’s social licence. Originality/value: Based on the information presented, students can use the case as a means to examine and critique community engagement approaches to social conflict resolution through this summary of a real-life example of social conflict in Peru’s mining industry. The case may also be used as the basis for teaching forward planning and contingency management for long-term projects involving stakeholders and potential conflict. The case has been used as a resource for teaching communications, risk evaluation and community engagement strategies as part of a Master’s in the Energy Sector Management programme in Peru.

Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)605-624
Number of pages20
JournalAcademia Revista Latinoamericana de Administracion
Volume31
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 6 2018

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Peru
Community relations
Community engagement
Social conflict
Social theory
Energy sector
Design methodology
Cultural heritage
Forward planning
License
Program management
Colonialism
Resources
Cultural theory
Stakeholders
Conflict resolution
Methodology
Livelihoods
Mining industry
Risk evaluation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management Science and Operations Research

Cite this

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title = "Miner{\'i}a y relaciones comunitarias en el Per{\'u}: ¿Se puede llegar a un acuerdo?",
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Minería y relaciones comunitarias en el Perú : ¿Se puede llegar a un acuerdo? / Morales, Oswaldo; Kleit, Andrew Nathan; Rees, Gareth H.

In: Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administracion, Vol. 31, No. 3, 06.08.2018, p. 605-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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