Mining end-of-life materials suitable for material resynthesis and discovering new application domains

Kristopher Doll, Conrad S. Tucker

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The United States generates more than 250 million tons of municipal solid waste (trash/garbage), with only 34% being recycled. In the broader global environment, the problem of waste management is becoming increasingly relevant, demanding innovative solutions. Traditional End-of-Life (EOL) approaches to managing waste include recycle, reuse, remanufacture and disposal. Recently, resynthesis was proposed as an alternative to traditional EOL options that combines multiple products to create a new product distinct from its parent assemblies. Resynthesis employs data mining and natural language processing algorithms to quantify assembly/subassembly combinations suitable for new product combinations. However, existing resynthesis methodologies proposed in the design community have been limited to exploring subassembly combinations, failing to explore potential combinations on a materials level. The authors of this paper propose a material resynthesis methodology that combines the materials of multiple EOL products using conventional manufacturing processes that generate candidate resynthesized materials that satisfy the needs of existing domains/applications. Appropriate applications for a resynthesized material are discovered by comparing the properties of the new material to the functional requirements of application classes which are found using clustering and latent semantic analysis. In the course of this paper, the authors present a case study that demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed material resynthesis methodology in the construction materials domain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication19th Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference; 8th International Conference on Micro- andNanosystems
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Volume4
ISBN (Electronic)9780791846353
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
EventASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014 - Buffalo, United States
Duration: Aug 17 2014Aug 20 2014

Other

OtherASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014
CountryUnited States
CityBuffalo
Period8/17/148/20/14

Fingerprint

Mining
Methodology
Latent Semantic Analysis
Municipal solid waste
Waste management
Life
Waste disposal
Data mining
Natural Language
Reuse
Semantics
Data Mining
Quantify
Manufacturing
Clustering
Distinct
Processing
Alternatives
Requirements
Demonstrate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

Cite this

Doll, K., & Tucker, C. S. (2014). Mining end-of-life materials suitable for material resynthesis and discovering new application domains. In 19th Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference; 8th International Conference on Micro- andNanosystems (Vol. 4). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2014-34779
Doll, Kristopher ; Tucker, Conrad S. / Mining end-of-life materials suitable for material resynthesis and discovering new application domains. 19th Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference; 8th International Conference on Micro- andNanosystems. Vol. 4 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2014.
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Doll, K & Tucker, CS 2014, Mining end-of-life materials suitable for material resynthesis and discovering new application domains. in 19th Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference; 8th International Conference on Micro- andNanosystems. vol. 4, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2014 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE 2014, Buffalo, United States, 8/17/14. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2014-34779

Mining end-of-life materials suitable for material resynthesis and discovering new application domains. / Doll, Kristopher; Tucker, Conrad S.

19th Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference; 8th International Conference on Micro- andNanosystems. Vol. 4 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2014.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Doll K, Tucker CS. Mining end-of-life materials suitable for material resynthesis and discovering new application domains. In 19th Design for Manufacturing and the Life Cycle Conference; 8th International Conference on Micro- andNanosystems. Vol. 4. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2014 https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2014-34779