Missionaries of faith and culture: Evangelical encounters in Ukraine

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, Catherine Wanner explores the historical factors contributing to a greater degree of religious pluralism emerging in Ukraine compared to Russia and Belarus and illustrates some of the cultural and political consequences of these more permissive policies. Using the intersection of foreign missionaries and evangelical communities in Ukraine as a lens, this article draws on historical and ethnographic evidence to argue that faith-based communities are sites of cultural innovation where the legacy of Soviet culture blends with values and practices born of other historical experiences to shape notions of morality and attitudes toward the state. Evangelical communities in this traditionally Orthodox land increasingly represent robust social institutions that offer new sources of self-definition, belonging, and communal life that are at once intensely local and broadly transnational in orientation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)732-755
Number of pages24
JournalSlavic Review
Volume63
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

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missionary
Ukraine
faith
community
social institution
pluralism
morality
Russia
innovation
evidence
Missionaries
Faith
Values
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Missionaries of faith and culture : Evangelical encounters in Ukraine. / Wanner, Catherine.

In: Slavic Review, Vol. 63, No. 4, 01.01.2004, p. 732-755.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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