Mitotic kinesins in action

diffusive searching, directional switching, and ensemble coordination

Allison M. Gicking, Weihong Qiu, William O. Hancock

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Mitotic spindle assembly requires the collective action of multiple microtubule motors that coordinate their activities in ensembles. However, despite significant advances in our understanding of mitotic kinesins at the single-motor level, multi-motor systems are challenging to reconstitute in vitro and thus less well understood. Recent findings highlighted in this perspective demonstrate how various properties of kinesin-5 and -14 motors—diffusive searching, directional switching, and multivalent interactions—allow them to achieve their physiological roles of cross-linking parallel microtubules and sliding antiparallel ones during cell division. Additionally, we highlight new experimental techniques that will help bridge the gap between in vitro biophysical studies and in vivo cell biology investigations and provide new insights into how specific single-molecule mechanisms generate complex cellular behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1153-1156
Number of pages4
JournalMolecular biology of the cell
Volume29
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2018

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Kinesin
Microtubules
Spindle Apparatus
Cell Division
Cell Biology
In Vitro Techniques

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

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title = "Mitotic kinesins in action: diffusive searching, directional switching, and ensemble coordination",
abstract = "Mitotic spindle assembly requires the collective action of multiple microtubule motors that coordinate their activities in ensembles. However, despite significant advances in our understanding of mitotic kinesins at the single-motor level, multi-motor systems are challenging to reconstitute in vitro and thus less well understood. Recent findings highlighted in this perspective demonstrate how various properties of kinesin-5 and -14 motors—diffusive searching, directional switching, and multivalent interactions—allow them to achieve their physiological roles of cross-linking parallel microtubules and sliding antiparallel ones during cell division. Additionally, we highlight new experimental techniques that will help bridge the gap between in vitro biophysical studies and in vivo cell biology investigations and provide new insights into how specific single-molecule mechanisms generate complex cellular behaviors.",
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Mitotic kinesins in action : diffusive searching, directional switching, and ensemble coordination. / Gicking, Allison M.; Qiu, Weihong; Hancock, William O.

In: Molecular biology of the cell, Vol. 29, No. 10, 15.05.2018, p. 1153-1156.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mitotic kinesins in action

T2 - diffusive searching, directional switching, and ensemble coordination

AU - Gicking, Allison M.

AU - Qiu, Weihong

AU - Hancock, William O.

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Y1 - 2018/5/15

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AB - Mitotic spindle assembly requires the collective action of multiple microtubule motors that coordinate their activities in ensembles. However, despite significant advances in our understanding of mitotic kinesins at the single-motor level, multi-motor systems are challenging to reconstitute in vitro and thus less well understood. Recent findings highlighted in this perspective demonstrate how various properties of kinesin-5 and -14 motors—diffusive searching, directional switching, and multivalent interactions—allow them to achieve their physiological roles of cross-linking parallel microtubules and sliding antiparallel ones during cell division. Additionally, we highlight new experimental techniques that will help bridge the gap between in vitro biophysical studies and in vivo cell biology investigations and provide new insights into how specific single-molecule mechanisms generate complex cellular behaviors.

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