Mnemonic strategy training improves memory for object location associations in both healthy elderly and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment: A randomized, single-blind study

Benjamin M. Hampstead, Krish Sathian, Pamela A. Phillips, Akshay Amaraneni, William R. Delaune, Anthony Y. Stringer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of mnemonic strategy training versus a matched-exposurecontrol condition and to examine the relationship between training-related gains, neuropsychologicalabilities, and medial temporal lobe volumetrics in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment(aMCI) and age-matched healthy controls. Method: Twenty-three of 45 screened healthy controlsand 29 of 42 screened patients with aMCI were randomized to mnemonic strategy or matchedexposuregroups. Groups were run in parallel, with participants blind to the other intervention. Allparticipants completed five sessions within 2 weeks. Memory testing for object-location associations(OLAs) was performed during sessions one and five and at a 1-month follow-up. DuringSessions 2-4, participants received either mnemonic strategy training or a matched number ofexposures with corrective feedback for a total of 45 OLAs. Structural magnetic resonance imagingwas performed in most participants, and medial temporal lobe volumetrics were acquired. Results:Twenty-one healthy controls and 28 patients with aMCI were included in data analysis. Mnemonicstrategy training was significantly more beneficial than matched exposure immediately after training, p = 006, partial ζ2 = 16, and at 1 month, p < .001, partial ζ2 = 35, regardless of diagnosticgroup (healthy group or aMCI group). Although patients with aMCI demonstrated gains comparableto the healthy control groups, their overall performance generally remained reduced. Mnemonicstrategy-related improvement was correlated positively with baseline memory and executive functioningand negatively with inferior lateral ventricle volume in patients with aMCI; no significantrelationships were evident in matched-exposure patients. Conclusion: Mnemonic strategies effectivelyimprove memory for specific content for at least 1 month in patients with aMCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-399
Number of pages15
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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