Modeling stability and change in borderline personality disorder symptoms using the revised interpersonal adjective scales-big five (IASR-B5)

Aidan G.C. Wright, Aaron Lee Pincus, Mark F. Lenzenweger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Personality disorders have been defined as "stable over time". However, research now supports marked change in the symptoms of these disorders and significant individual variability in the trajectories across time. Using the Longitudinal Study of Personality Disorders (Lenzenweger, 2006), we explore the ability of the Revised Interpersonal Adjective Scales - Big Five (IASR-B5; Trapnell & Wiggins, 1990) to predict individual variation in initial value and rate of change in borderline personality disorder symptoms. The dimensions of the IASR-B5 predict variability in initial symptoms and rates of change. Interaction effects emerged between Dominance and Conscientiousness, Love and Neuroticism, and Conscientiousness and Neuroticism in predicting initial symptoms; and between Dominance and Love and Love and Neuroticism in predicting rates of change, suggesting that the effects of broad domains of personality are not merely additive but conditional on each other.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)501-513
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Personality Assessment
Volume92
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

Borderline Personality Disorder
Love
Personality Disorders
Aptitude
Longitudinal Studies
Personality
Research
Neuroticism

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

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Modeling stability and change in borderline personality disorder symptoms using the revised interpersonal adjective scales-big five (IASR-B5). / Wright, Aidan G.C.; Pincus, Aaron Lee; Lenzenweger, Mark F.

In: Journal of Personality Assessment, Vol. 92, No. 6, 01.01.2010, p. 501-513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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