Modeling tanning salon behavioral tendencies using appearance motivation, self-monitoring and the Theory of Planned Behavior

Joel J. Hillhouse, Rob Turrisi, Monica Kastner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The constructs of appearance motivation and self-monitoring were added to the Theory of Planned Behavior in the prediction of tanning salon use in young people. The variables of the Theory of Planned Behavior proved effective at predicting tanning salon behavioral intentions and tendencies. Intentions and perceived behavioral control predicted tanning salon behavioral tendencies, while attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control predicted tanning salon behavioral intentions. Appearance motivation did not show any direct or interaction effects in the prediction of tanning salon behavioral intentions. It did, however, prove superior to health orientation in the prediction of tanning salon attitudes. Self-monitoring interacted with subjective norms in the prediction of tanning salon intentions, with high self-monitors showing stronger subjective norm-intention relationships than low self-monitors. These results imply that appearance-related interventions could prove efficacious in reducing young people's tanning salon behavioral tendencies. Furthermore, it may be important to consider individual's self-monitoring status when targeting skin cancer prevention information to young people.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)405-414
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume15
Issue number4
StatePublished - Aug 31 2000

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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