Modelling schizophrenia using human induced pluripotent stem cells

Kristen J. Brennand, Anthony Simone, Jessica Jou, Chelsea Gelboin-Burkhart, Ngoc Tran, Sarah Sangar, Yan Li, Yangling Mu, Gong Chen, Diana Yu, Shane McCarthy, Jonathan Sebat, Fred H. Gage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

802 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Schizophrenia (SCZD) is a debilitating neurological disorder with a world-wide prevalence of 1%; there is a strong genetic component, with an estimated heritability of 80ĝ€"85%. Although post-mortem studies have revealed reduced brain volume, cell size, spine density and abnormal neural distribution in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of SCZD brain tissue and neuropharmacological studies have implicated dopaminergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic activity in SCZD, the cell types affected in SCZD and the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease state remain unclear. To elucidate the cellular and molecular defects of SCZD, we directly reprogrammed fibroblasts from SCZD patients into human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and subsequently differentiated these disorder-specific hiPSCs into neurons (Supplementary Fig. 1). SCZD hiPSC neurons showed diminished neuronal connectivity in conjunction with decreased neurite number, PSD95-protein levels and glutamate receptor expression. Gene expression profiles of SCZD hiPSC neurons identified altered expression of many components of the cyclic AMP and WNT signalling pathways. Key cellular and molecular elements of the SCZD phenotype were ameliorated following treatment of SCZD hiPSC neurons with the antipsychotic loxapine. To date, hiPSC neuronal pathology has only been demonstrated in diseases characterized by both the loss of function of a single gene product and rapid disease progression in early childhood. We now report hiPSC neuronal phenotypes and gene expression changes associated with SCZD, a complex genetic psychiatric disorder.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-225
Number of pages5
JournalNature
Volume473
Issue number7346
DOIs
StatePublished - May 12 2011

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Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Schizophrenia
Neurons
Loxapine
Phenotype
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Glutamate Receptors
Brain
Neurites
Prefrontal Cortex
Nervous System Diseases
Cell Size
Transcriptome
Cyclic AMP
Antipsychotic Agents
Psychiatry
Disease Progression
Hippocampus
Spine
Fibroblasts

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Brennand, K. J., Simone, A., Jou, J., Gelboin-Burkhart, C., Tran, N., Sangar, S., ... Gage, F. H. (2011). Modelling schizophrenia using human induced pluripotent stem cells. Nature, 473(7346), 221-225. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature09915
Brennand, Kristen J. ; Simone, Anthony ; Jou, Jessica ; Gelboin-Burkhart, Chelsea ; Tran, Ngoc ; Sangar, Sarah ; Li, Yan ; Mu, Yangling ; Chen, Gong ; Yu, Diana ; McCarthy, Shane ; Sebat, Jonathan ; Gage, Fred H. / Modelling schizophrenia using human induced pluripotent stem cells. In: Nature. 2011 ; Vol. 473, No. 7346. pp. 221-225.
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Brennand, KJ, Simone, A, Jou, J, Gelboin-Burkhart, C, Tran, N, Sangar, S, Li, Y, Mu, Y, Chen, G, Yu, D, McCarthy, S, Sebat, J & Gage, FH 2011, 'Modelling schizophrenia using human induced pluripotent stem cells', Nature, vol. 473, no. 7346, pp. 221-225. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature09915

Modelling schizophrenia using human induced pluripotent stem cells. / Brennand, Kristen J.; Simone, Anthony; Jou, Jessica; Gelboin-Burkhart, Chelsea; Tran, Ngoc; Sangar, Sarah; Li, Yan; Mu, Yangling; Chen, Gong; Yu, Diana; McCarthy, Shane; Sebat, Jonathan; Gage, Fred H.

In: Nature, Vol. 473, No. 7346, 12.05.2011, p. 221-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Brennand KJ, Simone A, Jou J, Gelboin-Burkhart C, Tran N, Sangar S et al. Modelling schizophrenia using human induced pluripotent stem cells. Nature. 2011 May 12;473(7346):221-225. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature09915