MODIFICATION OF THE PEDALLING MECHANICS OF CYCLISTS.

D. J. Sanderson, Henry Joseph Sommer, III, P. R. Cavanagh

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

On-line computer representation of forces applied to the pedals were used to train a group of cyclists to modify their pattern of force application. Eight cyclists were instructed to modify their riding mechanics to minimize the forces applied to the pedals during a 90-degree recovery segment beginning at a crank angle of 225 degrees after top dead center. The subjects rode for 32 minutes each day for 10 days. At the end of the training period, the experimental group showed significantly reduced recovery forces. Analysis of the pedalling mechanics of each individual showed that while there was considerable variation in their response to the training, performance of a complex task can be modified by feedback of a biomechanical nature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages17-20
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1986

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Mechanics
Recovery
Feedback

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Sanderson, D. J., Sommer, III, H. J., & Cavanagh, P. R. (1986). MODIFICATION OF THE PEDALLING MECHANICS OF CYCLISTS.. 17-20.
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Sanderson, DJ, Sommer, III, HJ & Cavanagh, PR 1986, 'MODIFICATION OF THE PEDALLING MECHANICS OF CYCLISTS.', pp. 17-20.

MODIFICATION OF THE PEDALLING MECHANICS OF CYCLISTS. / Sanderson, D. J.; Sommer, III, Henry Joseph; Cavanagh, P. R.

1986. 17-20.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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