Molecular Dialog between Parasitic Plants and Their Hosts

Christopher R. Clarke, Michael P. Timko, John I. Yoder, Michael Axtell, James H. Westwood

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Parasitic plants steal sugars, water, and other nutrients from host plants through a haustorial connection. Several species of parasitic plants such as witchweeds (Striga spp.) and broomrapes (Orobanche and Phelipanche spp.) are major biotic constraints to agricultural production. Parasitic plants are understudied compared with other major classes of plant pathogens, but the recent availability of genomic and transcriptomic data has accelerated the rate of discovery of the molecular mechanisms underpinning plant parasitism. Here, we review the current body of knowledge of how parasitic plants sense host plants, germinate, form parasitic haustorial connections, and suppress host plant immune responses. Additionally, we assess whether parasitic plants fit within the current paradigms used to understand the molecular mechanisms of microbial plant-pathogen interactions. Finally, we discuss challenges facing parasitic plant research and propose the most urgent questions that need to be answered to advance our understanding of plant parasitism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-299
Number of pages21
JournalAnnual Review of Phytopathology
Volume57
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 25 2019

Fingerprint

parasitic plants
host plants
plant pathogens
parasitism
Orobanche
Striga
plant architecture
transcriptomics
immune response
agriculture
sugars
genomics
nutrients
water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Clarke, Christopher R. ; Timko, Michael P. ; Yoder, John I. ; Axtell, Michael ; Westwood, James H. / Molecular Dialog between Parasitic Plants and Their Hosts. In: Annual Review of Phytopathology. 2019 ; Vol. 57. pp. 279-299.
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Molecular Dialog between Parasitic Plants and Their Hosts. / Clarke, Christopher R.; Timko, Michael P.; Yoder, John I.; Axtell, Michael; Westwood, James H.

In: Annual Review of Phytopathology, Vol. 57, 25.08.2019, p. 279-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Timko, Michael P.

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AB - Parasitic plants steal sugars, water, and other nutrients from host plants through a haustorial connection. Several species of parasitic plants such as witchweeds (Striga spp.) and broomrapes (Orobanche and Phelipanche spp.) are major biotic constraints to agricultural production. Parasitic plants are understudied compared with other major classes of plant pathogens, but the recent availability of genomic and transcriptomic data has accelerated the rate of discovery of the molecular mechanisms underpinning plant parasitism. Here, we review the current body of knowledge of how parasitic plants sense host plants, germinate, form parasitic haustorial connections, and suppress host plant immune responses. Additionally, we assess whether parasitic plants fit within the current paradigms used to understand the molecular mechanisms of microbial plant-pathogen interactions. Finally, we discuss challenges facing parasitic plant research and propose the most urgent questions that need to be answered to advance our understanding of plant parasitism.

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