Molecular entanglement and electrospinnability of biopolymers

Lingyan Kong, Gregory R. Ziegler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electrospinning is a fascinating technique to fabricate micro- to nano-scale fibers from a wide variety of materials. For biopolymers, molecular entanglement of the constituent polymers in the spinning dope was found to be an essential prerequisite for successful electrospinning. Rheology is a powerful tool to probe the molecular conformation and interaction of biopolymers. In this report, we demonstrate the protocol for utilizing rheology to evaluate the electrospinnability of two biopolymers, starch and pullulan, from their dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/water dispersions. Well-formed starch and pullulan fibers with average diameters in the submicron to micron range were obtained. Electrospinnability was evaluated by visual and microscopic observation of the fibers formed. By correlating the rheological properties of the dispersions to their electrospinnability, we demonstrate that molecular conformation, molecular entanglement, and shear viscosity all affect electrospinning. Rheology is not only useful in solvent system selection and process optimization, but also in understanding the mechanism of fiber formation on a molecular level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere51933
JournalJournal of Visualized Experiments
Issue number91
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 17 2014

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Biopolymers
Rheology
Molecular Conformation
Electrospinning
Starch
Fibers
Dispersions
Conformations
Dimethyl Sulfoxide
Viscosity
Molecular Probes
Dimethyl sulfoxide
Shear viscosity
Polymers
Water
pullulan

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

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Molecular entanglement and electrospinnability of biopolymers. / Kong, Lingyan; Ziegler, Gregory R.

In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, No. 91, e51933, 17.09.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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